GoMediaZine » Tutorials http://www.gomediazine.com Design insights & tutorials. Wed, 23 Apr 2014 13:25:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Go Media owners Jeff Finley and Bill Beachy host the show and discuss the business of design and how to improve the quality of your work and life. Go Media no Go Media jeff@gomedia.us jeff@gomedia.us (Go Media) Go Media Real-world advice from working artists and designers. graphic design, artist, business, inspiration, go media, tutorials, advice, illustration, photoshop, illustrator, art GoMediaZine » Tutorials http://www.gomediazine.com/wp-content/images/powerpress/gomedia-podcast-300x300.png http://www.gomediazine.com/category/tutorials/ Cleveland, Ohio Monthly Tutorial: using metal and rust textures to destroy a design http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/tutorial-using-metal-and-rust-textures-to-destroy-a-design/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tutorial-using-metal-and-rust-textures-to-destroy-a-design http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/tutorial-using-metal-and-rust-textures-to-destroy-a-design/#comments Tue, 22 Apr 2014 14:00:32 +0000 Simon H. http://www.gomediazine.com/?p=43606 Hello all! Simon from Studio Ace of Spade here again, ready to show you how to use my latest textures, the metal dumpster texture pack, to destroy and weather out the crap of your designs. Continue Reading »

The post Tutorial: using metal and rust textures to destroy a design appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
Hello all!

Simon from Studio Ace of Spade here again, ready to show you how to use my latest textures, the metal dumpster texture pack, to destroy and weather out the crap of your designs.

The metal dumpster texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

What’s in the pack?

A little while ago, there was one of these huge metal dumpsters sitting in a parking lot. Since no texture library is complete without rust and metal textures, I got my camera out and shot as many images I could of the banged-up monster. The textures range from subtle speckles in the paint to massive rust damage. This makes this pack highly versatile, and will help you bring either subtle touches or nuclear damage to your pieces.

The metal dumpster texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

The textures can be used as overlays, or pasted in layer masks. There are 45 textures in the pack, sized at 3264 x 2448 pixels.

The metal dumpster texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

How can I use these textures?

Well, I’m glad you’re asking, because just like with my photocopy noise textures pack, I’ve taken the time to write a little tutorial. We’ll be using OKPants’ sweet Road Hog tee design pack as the base artwork for our experimentation. What’s the Road Hog tee design pack, you ask? The Go Media team wrote a very convenient blog post to answer the questions you could have.

This tutorial is rather short, and takes advantage of layer masks and blending modes. Count around an hour of playtime in both Illustrator (Ai) and Photoshop (Ps). Plug your headphones, press play on some nice music, and let’s go.

The starting point: preparing the Road Hog design to our liking

The Road Hog tee design pack includes a biker/Americana inspired design, that you could take apart and re-arrange to your liking. Or, like me, you could just leave it in one piece. Here’s a shot of the design in Ai. This is the “sea foam” color palette.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

The design also comes in a black and white color palette, an “heritage” color palette (rust tones), and an “Americana” color palette. Feel free to choose the one you prefer for this tutorial.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

The original sea foam palette is nice, but the tones are a tad too strong and saturated for my taste. After a bit of research on Colourlovers, I managed to find a more subdued version of the color palette. After using the magic wand (Y) and the Select > Same > Fill color menu a few times, our base art was recolored.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

The re-coloration process is really easy since the design is simple and the vectors well constructed. Just make sure that all of your shapes are ungrouped and unlocked, and it should go smoothly. I switched the bright yellow to the faded yellow at the left of the color palette image (#f0eec1), the main blue hue to the palette’s faded blue (#b2dabf), and the black to the dark brown/purple (#5c4a4e) at the right of the palette. I created the darker blue by lowering the brightness value of the light blue, which gave me #727d71.

After recoloring the artwork, I added an outline to it. There are multiple ways to do so, but here’s how I do it:

  1. Make sure all of your elements are grouped togetherThe metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann
  2. Duplicate the designThe metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann
  3. Merge the bottom copy in one shape using the pathfinder’s Unite functionThe metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann
  4. Change the color of the merged shape to #f0eec1. I chose the light color because I thought at that stage that the background of my final piece would be dark (the design has been hidden in this shot.)
    The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann
  5. Finally, turn the design back on, and use the Offset path function (Object > Path > Offset path) to create the outline. I use Offset path as opposed to a stroke, because the result looks more polished. The downside to that is that unlike a stroke, you can’t easily edit the width of the outline once it’s been created. A few things about the values I’ve used: the thickness of the offset is set at 1/8th of an inch, and the joins to round for a softer feel.The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky HartmannThe metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann
  6. We’ve got ourselves an outline. To make things a bit cleaner, you can run the pathfinder’s unite function on that outline group one more time. This will fuse the multiple shapes that compose it together, living us with one big, clean entity. I’ve highlighted in red the area where the most simplification will happen.
    The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky HartmannThe metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Now that we’ve got ourselves a recolored and outlined design, it’s time to move things to Photoshop.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Setting up the stage in Ps

Much like when we were playing with the Awaken design, our Ps document will be an 18″x24″ @ 300 dpi canvas. This time, it’ll be setup in a portrait orientation.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

I’ve completed the setup of my document with guides. I might have created a few too many, but oh well. I have guides at the 1, 2, 8, 9, 10, 16, and 17 inches marks vertically, and 1, 2, 11, 12, 13, 22, and 23 inches marks horizontally.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Background preparation

As I’ve said when we were preparing our vectors and adding an outline to them, my original intentions were to have a dark background on our piece. After progressing in my design, I realized that it wouldn’t work very well, so I went back and made sure that my background would be light instead of dark. For the sake of brevity, I’ll spare you that back and forth in this tutorial. So let’s skip directly to the correct layer order for a light background with a dark border.

Let’s fill the background layer with that faded yellow (#f0eec1) from our color palette.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

On top of that layer, create a new one, filled with our dark brown this time (#584c4e).

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

We’re going to take advantage of the Arsenal’s vintage poster borders texture pack to reveal the underlying yellow layer to make it look like there’s a dark border around our design. The process is very simple, and consists of pasting one of these textures (I used the first one in the pack) in a layer mask. Jeff made a video with step by step instructions, and it’s visible here:

Vintage Border effects in Photoshop using Layer Masks from Go Media on Vimeo.

The result of that manipulation is the following:

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Note that if you don’t own the poster border textures, you could paste any other grunge texture in the layer mask. This series of free vintage film plates textures from Lost and Taken would be an interesting alternate, although a tad too intense in this example:

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Anyways. Once you’ve prepared your background, it’s time to move along and import our vector design in our Ps document.

Pasting the design from Ai

That’s probably the easiest step: simply copy your design in Ai, and paste in as a smart object in Ps. I sized mine to be around 16 inches wide.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Texturing the design itself

It’s finally time to use the metal dumpster textures. Place metal-dumpster-textures-018-sbh.jpg above the design.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

The elements of the texture we’re interested in are these dark scratch marks. In order to extract them, we’ll need to desaturate the texture (CTRL/CMD+SHIFT+U), and to change its blending mode to Screen.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

It’s not yet very exciting, I’ll give you that. Next, we’ll invert the texture (CTRL/CMD+I).

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

We’re already starting to see these scratches impact the design as if it was painted on metal and exposed to things scraping it off its support. To further the effect, we’ll play with the level palette (CTRL/CMD + L), in order to increase the contrast of the texture.

A few notes about my Levels values: the 100 on the left is the value for the dark tones. It means that I’ve made the dark pixels of the texture darker than what they originally were. The 0.75 is the value for the mid-tones. That slider is normally set at 1. Bringing it to 0.75 means that the mid-tones are also going to be darker. Finally, the 175 on the right is the value for the light pixels of the texture. It’s set to 255 by default. Bringing it down to 175 means that the light pixels are actually going to be lighter. Darker blacks and grays + lighter whites = high contrast texture.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Finally, I’ve leveraged a layer mask to allow the texture to show only on the design and not on the background.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

To create such a layer mask is easy. CTRL/CMD+CLICK the thumbnail of your design layer to create a precise selection of its content, then click the new layer mask button at the bottom of your layer palette.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Following a similar process, I also added metal-dumpster-textures-022-sbh.jpg to the design. Its effects are much more subtle, but you can see them in the gear behind the skull/wings/bones element.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

My levels values were a bit different:

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

It’s also to be noted that the texture was not inverted, and put on the Soft light blending mode at 25% opacity. I chose to do so because the results were less aggressive than when using Screen. I’ve also confined its effect to the design only by using the same layer mask  process than before.

The next step was to impact the design layer even more than with its two textures. In order to do so, I gave it its own layer mask, and pasted metal-dumpster-textures-001-sbh.jpg into it. After sizing it to cover most of the design, and playing with levels to bring its contrast to new heights, this is the result:

The original texture

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Playing with levels

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

The result

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Impacted areas details

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

To increase the worn feel even further, I created a layer group containing the design’s layer and my texture. I then duplicated the background dark brown layer’s layer mask (CLICK & DRAG + ALT/OPTION+SHIFT) to it. The result isn’t very visible, but some of the mask’s grain lets the dark brown show through.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Global textures

If the textures at the previous step are important because they give their character to the design elements themselves, the ones we’ll apply now are just as important. They participate to tie the piece together, by giving their artifacts to the various design elements and the background in a continuous manner. You can choose to apply a lot of them, or just a few. I have three in my case.

The first one is metal-dumpster-textures-012-sbh.jpg. As you can see, it’s a fairly clean texture. The main elements I’m interested to see passed on to the design are those black, dirty marks. They look like smeared paint.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

After placing the texture in the design (rotated 90° counter-clockwise), desaturating it, I’ve leveraged the levels to get the dark and mid-tones much stronger.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Once the blending mode switched to Soft light, and the opacity lowered to 50%, the result brings some subtle darker areas in the top left of the piece. It’s like some liquid slightly stained the art.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

The next to last texture we’ll use is metal-dumpster-textures-037-sbh.jpg. It’s a texture that I use as a grain texture. There are only a few speckles of rust here and there, and the rest are a few light dots.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

After desaturating it and playing with levels, here’s what the texture looks like:

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

And below is the result on the piece after switching it to Soft light @ 50% opacity. It’s very subtle, but still adds a little something.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Finally, the last texture I’ve used to add more of the same dirty stain type of finish to the poster is metal-dumpster-textures-030-sbh.jpg.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Nothing special to add to the process used before, other than because this one was a bit intense, I’ve put on Soft light @ 35% opacity only.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

The last touches

We could add more textures to the piece, but it wouldn’t add much to the design. It’s better to stop there. Now, you could either leave the piece here, or add just a tiny bit more of contrast and grain. Either way is fine by me, and will equally look nice. You could also add fake folds too, but we’ll get to that in an upcoming tutorial.

The first of the finishing touches is to create a layer that contains a merged copy of all the layers of our piece. There’s a keyboard shortcut for that: CTRL/CMD+SHIFT+ALT/OPTION+E. Simply select your top layer, and press the keyboard shortcut. It will generate a new layer containing that merged copy of your piece. I renamed mine to “Comp” and placed it in its own layer group.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Next, make two copies of that layer. Name the bottom one Aged 2, and turn the top one off for now.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Download this Aged 2 action created by the good peeps at Go Media for an old tutorial, and run it on the Aged 2 layer. Put the layer on Soft light @ 25% opacity. The action created a photocopy type of effect, with something looking like old ink and grain. Below is a close up shot before and after switching the blending mode.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Finally, we’ll use the stamp effect action Jeff released a little while back. Run the action on that last copy of the Comp layer we have remaining. The action will create two layers, one with just the black pixels of the stamp effect, and another one (usually turned off) with some more details. Turn both of the layers on, merge them together, and call the result Stamp. Place that last layer on Soft light @ 25% opacity and you’re done!

If you want more info about the action before buying it, you can read this quick blog post written for its release.

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

Done!

And the piece is done! Using the metal dumpster texture pack, we were successfully able to age and destroy the design. You should totally mock-up your piece to impress your clients:

The metal dumpster texture pack demo - by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

That’s it for me today. If you have any questions or suggestion about the tutorial or the textures, don’t hesitate to use the comments, or to tweet at me.

BUY THE METAL DUMPSTER TEXTURE PACK

BUY THE ROAD HOG TEE DESIGN PACK

The post Tutorial: using metal and rust textures to destroy a design appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/tutorial-using-metal-and-rust-textures-to-destroy-a-design/feed/ 0
Tutorial: Aged poster design with the Photocopy Noise Texture Pack http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/illustrator/introducing-the-photocopy-noise-texture-pack/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=introducing-the-photocopy-noise-texture-pack http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/illustrator/introducing-the-photocopy-noise-texture-pack/#comments Tue, 15 Apr 2014 13:27:51 +0000 Simon H. http://www.gomediazine.com/?p=43223 Hello there! Simon from Studio Ace of Spade here. Long time no see. I'm here to introduce you today to a texture pack I've created, called the photocopy noise texture pack. I'm delighted to announce that it's finally on sale at the Arsenal! Continue Reading »

The post Tutorial: Aged poster design with the Photocopy Noise Texture Pack appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
Hello there!

Simon from Studio Ace of Spade here. Long time no see. I’m here to introduce you today to a texture pack I’ve created, called the photocopy noise texture pack. I’m delighted to announce that it’s finally on sale at the Arsenal!

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann

What is the pack about?

What’s so special about this texture pack? First of all, these are hand-made textures. They were made using an old photocopier that had a toner on its last leg. The result is a pack of six fantastic noise textures. The process was simple: I created a black document in Ai, and printed it as many times as I could before the toner gave up. Because it was almost ready to throw away, it wouldn’t print a perfectly black sheet. I got these black rectangles, speckled with white spots and stripes. Once scanned in, cleaned up, and inverted, these make up for perfect noise textures.

A closer look at the content

Some technical data: you get six textures, that are around 4760×6400 @ 600 dpi. Here are what they look like:

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Previews

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Previews

How can I use these?

I thought you’d never ask! In order to demonstrate the possibilities of the textures, I’ve put a quick little tutorial/demo together, using Jeff’s Awakened t-shirt design pack as the base. We’ll use both Ai and Ps for this. Here’s a preview of what we’ll be doing:

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo result

Basically, we’ll use these to age Jeff’s design, along with a few other tricks here and there. Here’s a 100% crop, to get a better sense of what these textures are able to do:

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo result, 100% crop

Note that if you haven’t purchased the Awakened t-shirt pack, or have no idea of what I’m talking about, you should go read and watch more info: over here.

Let’s get started

 Step 1: document setup

Jeff’s illustration is quite neat, and would look quite awesome on a print. So, let’s go ahead and create a new 24 inches wide by 18 inches tall Ps document @ 300 dpi.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Once you have that new document setup, fill its background with dark gray (#231f20), and setup guides for the center and margins. I might have gone a tad overboard with mine. My vertical guides are at the one, two, 11, 12, 13, 22, and 23 inch marks. My horizontal guides are at the one, two, eight, nine, 10, 16, and 17 inch marks.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Oh, and if you’ve read some of my other tutorials before, you’ll probably remember that I’m a stickler for proper layer naming and other Ps etiquette stuff. My background layer is named bg – #231f20, which gives me both its functionality and its color.

Step 2: importing the design

Let’s have a look at Jeff’s design:

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

As you can see, there are quite a few elements that compose it (feathers, purple circular element, red circles, white circle, blue geometrical element, silhouette, and off white stars). I could simply select everything, and copy and paste it in Ps. The only issue with doing that is that it won’t allow us to individually texture the elements. Since I want to do something refined and individualized, I won’t go that route. We’re going to copy and paste each element one by one. It’ll be a bit long, but worth it in the end.

Use the main image as a reference point to position your elements, and make sure that they’re always sized at 100%. Also, don’t forget to paste the elements as smart objects, so they retain their vector characteristics. It’ll be crucial for later.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Note: you may have to center or nudge elements manually.

The purple circular pattern.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

The red circles.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

The blue geometrical element.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

The white circles.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

The black silhouette.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

The stars.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Aligning the stars back in place (the top star is at the intersection of the top red circles).

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Nudging the wings back in place.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Here’s a view of how the design elements are placed compared to my initial guides. If you want your design or some of its elements to be bigger or smaller within the finished print, now is the time to adjust the sizes. For instance, I’ve decided to size my design so it reaches the smaller rectangles inside of my guides.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

And here’s a view of my layer stack so far.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Step 3: let’s roughen these vectors up

The next step will involve the use of Illustrator’s roughen filter (Effect > Distort and transform > Roughen). I learned about the effect through that 2011 Method and Craft article by Simon Walker. Basically, the effect distorts your paths and adds more or less subtle variations to them.

We’ll be applying the effect on all of the elements of the design, minus the wings. This is where retaining the smart object quality of the elements pasted in Ps comes handy. You simply have to double click on the layer thumbnails of the smart object in order to be brought back to Ai, and to be able to edit the vector element.

Let’s start with the purple circular pattern element. I’ve turned off the other elements of the design for better legibility, but you don’t have to.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Once you’ll double click on the layer thumbnail, Ai will open and you’ll be able to edit just that element.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Let’s select our element, and bring up the roughen filter (Effect > Distort and transform > Roughen). I suggest zooming in a little bit, in order to fully appreciate what the effect does to your paths. Oh, and tick that “Preview” box to see what’s happening.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Obviously, the default values are a bit extreme in terms of result. After a little bit of tinkering, the values I’ve settled on are the following:

  • Size: 0.1%, relative
  • Detail: 50/inch
  • Points: smooth

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Note that you can come up with your own values. These should be considered as a starting point for your own exploration. Also, you could decide to expand the various elements from strokes to paths, or to leave them as is. Once you’re happy with the filter’s values, validate them. The next step: save your work (CTRL/CMD+S), close the file in Ai, and head back to Ps for a little surprise…

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

The effect is applied! Isn’t that neat? Now, you’ll simply have to go through the same process for the other design elements (minus the wings, once again: the halftone effect they have is enough). I personally used the same values for the roughen filter for all the elements, as it gives consistency to the final piece, but you could spend the time to find the perfect values that works the best for each specific part of the design. Below, a few shots of the process, up close:

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Note the special values I’ve ended up using for the white circles: the effect wasn’t visible enough with the other ones I settled on earlier, so I upped the ante a bit. I did return to my previous values for the other elements though.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

And done with that part.

Step 4: textures!

Finally, we can play with textures here. The photocopy noise texture pack is made of black and white textures, which will somewhat dictate the workflow we’ll have with them. First, we need a bit of a refresher about blending modes. This wonderful article by PhotoBlogStop will give you every detail you ever wanted to know about them, including math (!), but we’ll focus on Screen:

Screen: Similar to the Lighten blend mode, but brighter and removes more of the dark pixels, and results in smoother transitions. Works somewhat like the Multiply blend mode, in that it multiplies the light pixels (instead of the dark pixels like the Multiply blend mode does). As an analogy, imagine the selected layer and each of the underlying layers as being 35mm slides, and each slide being placed in a separate projector (one slide for each projector), then all of the projectors are turned on and pointed at the same projector screen…this is the effect of the Screen blend mode. This is a great mode for making blacks disappear while keeping the whites, and for making glow effects.

The most interesting part of this quote is the emphasized sentence: “this is a great mode for making blacks disappear while keeping the whites, and for making glow effects.” It just happens that the noise effects in the textures from our pack ARE white speckles and stripes. So we simply have to put the textures on screen to retain just their noisy part, and the rest shows up as transparent. After that, if the effect is too strong, you simply play with the opacity slider of the texture layer. Let’s put this into practice by adding some noise to our background layer.

Go ahead and place photocopy-noise-textures-sbh-001.jpg in your design. It should be just above the background layer, and sized to cover the whole background.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Give it a quick sharpening (Filter > Sharpen > Sharpen), and simply change the layer’s blending mode to Screen. As you can see, the effect is quite strong.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

We’re simply going to lower the opacity of the layer to 25% for something a bit more subtle.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Also, I’ve given the background elements their own layer group.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

It’s time to start adding our subtle noise to the rest of the design. We could simply use the texture clipped over each element, and tinker with the opacity sliders to create some subtle overlays. But this would show the noise as white or light gray speckles over each design elements. Most of these being line art, we wouldn’t see much of an effect.

We’re going to use another trick from our bag, and paste the textures in layer masks. Remember that whatever part of a layer mask that’s white shows the art, and whatever part of it that’s black hides it. Armed with knowledge, we can deduce that pasting the textures as is will simply obliterate the designs. Nothing subtle here. What we can do however is to invert the textures once they’ve been pasted in the layer masks. From there, playing with levels to increase or decrease the intensity of the effect is child’s play.

The process to paste a texture in a layer mask is easy:

  1. Add a layer mask to the design element you’re interested in impacting (with the layer highlighted, go to Layer > Layer mask > Reveal all). Make sure to click the little chain link between the layer and the layer mask to make it disappear. This will allow you to move or resize the content of the layer mask without changing the design element itself
  2. Open your texture file, copy its content (CTRL/CMD+C)
  3. Go back to your design, and ALT/OPTION + CLICK your layer mask. This will allow you to get access to and edit the content of the layer mask itself, rather than your design
  4. Paste your texture (CTRL/CMD+V)
  5. Resize and edit the content of the layer mask at will
  6. Click back on the design element and admire the result of your work

Here are some images of the process with the wings. I’ve used photocopy-noise-textures-sbh-001.jpg again.

Layer mask added and unlinked.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Pasting the texture in the layer mask.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Resizing the texture to cover the whole canvas. You have access to the same transform controls that outside of the layer mask (CTRL/CMD+T or CTRL/CMD+SHIFT+T for proportional transformations).

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Inverting the texture (CTRL/CMD+I).

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Using the levels palette (CTRL/CMD+L) to increase the contrast.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Admiring the result.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Comparison with the layer mask turned off.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Some of impacted areas highlighted.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

As you can see, it’s quite a simple process, and the result with the photocopy noise texture pack are just the right amount of subtle.

Following a similar workflow, I worked my way through the other elements of the design, using textures #1 to #5 of the pack (#6 will used for the final finishing touch).

Below, some before and after pictures for each element:

Purple circular pattern, before

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Purple circular pattern, after (background turned off for better effect appreciation)

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Layer mask details

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Red circles, before

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Red circles, after

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Layer mask details

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

It can seem that the effect is too subtle. Here’s a 100% crop to convince you otherwise:

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Blue geometrical element, before

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Blue geometrical element, after

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Layer mask detail

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

White circles, before

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

White circles, after

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Layer mask detail

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Silhouette, before

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Silhouette, after

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Layer mask detail

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Stars, before

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Stars, after

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Layer mask detail. Note that I’ve used the same textures than for the silhouette. I’ve simply moved it to the top right a little bit.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

And here’s the full design after all that process:

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

We’re almost done. It’s time for the finishing touches.

Step 5: let’s wrap this up

Now that all of our design elements got their individual weathering treatment, it’s time to tie everything up together. In order to do so, we’ll first add a layer mask to the whole design layer group, and paste one of our textures in there. This will unite the elements together visually, by giving them a consistent weathering. I used photocopy-noise-textures-sbh-004.jpg for that (the one with the heavy striping).

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Once that’s done, we’ll add two more textures at the top of our layer stack. The aim is the same: to tie all the elements visually together, by impacting them all with the same element. First, let’s add photocopy-noise-textures-sbh-005.jpg to our design. Make sure it fills the whole canvas.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Let’s make it significantly darker, so its effect will be much more intense.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

After that, change its blending mode to Screen.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Since the effect was a tad overbearing, I lowered the opacity to 25%.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

We could stay there, but I’d like a effect similar to a vignette, that would detach the center piece from the background a bit. I’ll be using photocopy-noise-textures-sbh-006.jpg to accomplish this. Let’s place it into our document, in a way similar to the image below (it’s been rotated upside down, and scaled up so it covers the whole design). I’ve also given the two top textures their own Global textures layer group.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Once it’s in place, simply change the blending mode to Soft light, and lover the layer opacity to 25%. This gives a much softer result than Screen, and still let’s the background’s subtle noise show through.

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

And we’re done! You could take the time to mock this up on a poster mockup template if you wanted to:

The photocopy noise texture pack by The Shop / Simon Birky Hartmann - Product demo

Last words

I hope you liked going through this tutorial as much as I liked writing it. I also hope it convinced you to get the photocopy noise texture pack, as well as Jeff’s Awakened tee design pack if it isn’t already done. If you have any questions, feel free to tweet at me (@simonhartmann)! I’ll also be watching the comments in the next few days. Thanks again for reading, and until next time, cheers!

BUY THE PHOTOCOPY NOISE TEXTURE PACK

BUY THE AWAKENED TEE DESIGN PACK

The post Tutorial: Aged poster design with the Photocopy Noise Texture Pack appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/illustrator/introducing-the-photocopy-noise-texture-pack/feed/ 0
How Go Media makes their amazing mockup templates, Hamster Style! http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/hamster-dance/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=hamster-dance http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/hamster-dance/#comments Mon, 17 Feb 2014 13:27:43 +0000 Aaron Roberts http://www.gomediazine.com/?p=40648 Here at Go Media, we're custom template creating machines. Between our mockup sites Shirt Mockup and Mockup Everything, the mockup packs on our Arsenal and custom templates for clients, we've got our system down to a science. Disclaimer: Creating these nicely organized and layered files, for ease of mockup, is far from easy. Follow along with me as I create a custom template, from high resolution photograph, to clean and crisp PSD file. Continue Reading »

The post How Go Media makes their amazing mockup templates, Hamster Style! appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
Go Media Approved

Here at Go Media, we’re custom template creating machines.

Between our mockup sites Shirt Mockup and Mockup Everything, the mockup packs on our Arsenal and custom templates for clients, we’ve got our system down to a science.

Disclaimer: Creating these nicely organized and layered files is far from easy for that matter, even for us after all these years. So sit with us and stay awhile. We want to make sure we do this the Go Media way.

Ready?

Follow along with me as I create this custom hamster jumpsuit template, from high resolution photograph, to clean and crisp PSD file.

What you're making. Yep!

What you’re making. Yep!

Ideal Conditions

A white/neutral background: This will make tracing the garment much easier.

Red Garments: Red is a great middle value color, which means it shows relatively equal amounts of shadows and highlights. * If you’re not shooting a red garment make sure there is enough contrast between shadows and highlights. In the end, we’ll want to be able to change the garment’s color while keeping it’s natural look.

Sharpness of Image: Sharper images will contain more pixel information. This is crucial editing shadows and highlights.

Duplicate your background.

This is the layer that you’ll be working on. Right click on your background layer to duplicate it then double click to rename that new layer. Once you’ve done this, hide your original background layer.

HamsterDance_ZineImages_1

Photo Cleanup

This will save you time later. Clone tool out any unwanted fuzz, spots, creases, or tags.

Tracing Garment/Subject

Using the pen tool “Paths”, trace just inside the edge of the garment to ensure that you’re not including part of the background. Tracing every detail/fold in fabric will keep it from looking stiff. This is one of the most important steps, and it can take some time. Be patient.

HamsterDance_ZineImages_2

Once you have traced a garment, it will automatically be saved in your “Paths” palette as a “Work Path” – double click to rename it to something more specific. this will allow you to add more paths to the garment later.

HamsterDance_ZineImages_3

Right click on your path and “Make Selection” (click OK on the dialog box that opens). I’m a firm believer in keeping as much of the original photo in tact as possible. To do this I use “Layer Masks”. Ultimately it will make your file size larger, but will save headaches if you need to change something later.

HamsterDance_ZineImages_4

 

Layer Masking

Now that you have your garment selected, go back to your layers palette and click the layer mask button at the bottom of your layers palette to isolate it. If you ever need to show or hide parts of this garment you can do so in the mask layer without actually deleting any pixels. Add a solid color background to be sure you didn’t miss anything. I usually stick with a middle value gray.

HamsterDance_ZineImages_5

 

HamsterDance_ZineImages_6

Shadows & Highlights Setup

Duplicate the garment layer twice. These will act as your shadows and highlights. Rename the layers accordingly “GarmentName – Shadows” and “GarmentName – Highlights”  It’s good to get in the habit of organizing your layers. At this point I’ll create a main Garment folder, in this case “Jacket” as well as “Shadow” and “Highlights” folders.

HamsterDance_ZineImages_7

 

After that, move the layers into their respective folders. Select the Shadows layer and change its blending mode to Linear Burn. This will set your shadows to show a good amount of contrast and vibrancy.

HamsterDance_ZineImages_8

Adding Hue & Curves Adjustment Layers

At the bottom of your layers palette, click on the black and white circle  to add a Hue & Saturation adjustment layer. Change the Saturation to “-100″.

HamsterDance_ZineImages_9

Add a Curves adjustment layer above that.

Currently these adjustment layers affect the entire document. We will need to make them only affect the shadow/highlight layer they’re above by creating a clipping mask. Hold shift to select both the Curves and Hue adjustment layers then right click and “Create Clipping Mask”. You’ll see two arrows appear next to the adjustment layers to indicate that they’ve been clipped into the layer below.

HamsterDance_ZineImages_10

 HamsterDance_ZineImages_11HamsterDance_ZineImages_12

Next, move onto your Highlights Layer and change its blending mode to “Screen”. This will knockout the shadows of the garment and allow you to focus on the amount of highlights that are visible

Repeat steps 4-6 to create the Hue and Curves adjustments for your Highlights Layer.

 

Optimizing Shadows/Highlights

One of great uses a mockup template is the ability to change the color of the garment. These next steps will ensure that shadows and highlights are consistent no matter what color you apply.

Our next step is to add a White color adjustment layer and clip it into the original garment layer. (you can also apply a color overlay blending mode to get the same result)

*Photoshop automatically adds a mask to that layer – this will come in handy should you need multi-colored sections.

Make sure your Highlights folder is hidden then move onto the Curves adjustment layer that is clipped into the Garment-Shadows layer.

On the left side of the Curves palette, click the button with the exclamation point to get a more accurate view of the histogram. This will show you the brightness values of the image.

HamsterDance_ZineImages_13

Plot points around the three highest values in an arch as shown. From there you can adjust each point to optimize the amount of shadows will appear. Shadows will become lighter the further away from the brightness values you are. If the points are plotted too far away, you run the risk of the shadows looking pixelated and blown out.

HamsterDance_ZineImages_14

 *Every garment’s brightness values will be different, but this arch will serve as a general guide to plotting points.

 

Once you have the shadows to a place that looks natural, hide your Shadows folder and add a Black color adjustment above the White layer. The same rules apply to editing the curves of the highlights only they’re opposite of the shadows.

HamsterDance_ZineImages_15

Once your shadows and highlights are set up correctly, any color you apply to your base garment layer will look natural.

HamsterDance_ZineImages_16

 

*If the amount of layers you have is overwhelming and you’re confident with the shadows/highlights you have set – you can always select the Curves, Hue, and Garment layer – right click and merge those layers.

HamsterDance_ZineImages_19

If you’re looking to customize a whole outfit just repeat all these steps for each garment and you could create your very own hamster jumpsuit.

HamsterDance_ZineImages_17

-or clip your artwork into the base garment layer to make some wicked snowboard gear!

HamsterDance_ZineImages_18

 

Great job!

Hard work, huh?

Pick your pleasure

Check out the hundreds of templates we’ve created on our sites Shirt Mockup, Mockup Everything and the Arsenal.

shirtmockup300x250

Shirt Mockup is a free tool used to realistically mockup your designs on tees. The Pro Version is available, offering you a larger variety of t-shirt templates. It’s super easy. Upload your art, receive a jpeg snapshot of your design. Try it free for 7 days!

email-header

Mockup Everything, similar to Shirt Mockup, provides designers with an easy-to-use platform for applying graphic designs to a growing variety of print products in multiple categories including technology, apparel, print, outdoor and food & beverage. Also like Shirt Mockup, both free and Pro versions are available. Mockup Everything is similarly super easy to use and designers receive jpeg snapshots of their designs. Try the Pro version free for 7 days!

arsenal_image

Want the very best in Mockup Templates, wrapped up in neat and clean Photoshop files just like you saw Aaron create above? Look no further than the Arsenal. Our Mockup Template packs come in all varieties, from tees to hoodies, posters to tanks and more.

The post How Go Media makes their amazing mockup templates, Hamster Style! appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/hamster-dance/feed/ 1
Tutorial: The Making Of An Editorial Illustration with These Are Things http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/tutorial-the-making-of-an-editorial-illustration-with-these-are-things/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tutorial-the-making-of-an-editorial-illustration-with-these-are-things http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/tutorial-the-making-of-an-editorial-illustration-with-these-are-things/#comments Tue, 28 Jan 2014 14:10:40 +0000 These Are Things http://www.gomediazine.com/?p=39959 Flip through your favorite newspaper or magazine and you’re bound to find a lot more than just words on a page. Alongside many articles, you’ll find art that helps to illuminate key concepts from the text. These pieces are called editorial illustrations. From tiny spot illustrations to multiple page spreads, these informative works of art are sprinkled throughout each issue. Political cartoons are a classic example of editorial illustrations, but today’s publications use the work of contemporary artists to visually interpret a wide range of topics. As editorial illustrators, our job is to create an engaging visual that both supports and explains the accompanying text copy. A successful piece carefully balances the art director’s vision with our own ideas, all while clearly communicating the article’s core idea to the reader. These projects an exercise in creative problem solving. From the super-quick turnaround to the varied subject matter, each assignment is a new visual puzzle for us to solve. Today, we’re going show you how we created an editorial illustration for Southwest Airlines’ in-flight magazine, Spirit. We’ll walk you through the entire illustration process, from our first client conversation to seeing our work in print. Continue Reading »

The post Tutorial: The Making Of An Editorial Illustration with These Are Things appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
A These Are Things Tutorial:

Flip through your favorite newspaper or magazine and you’re bound to find a lot more than just words on a page. Alongside many articles, you’ll find art that helps to illuminate key concepts from the text. These pieces are called editorial illustrations.

From tiny spot illustrations to multiple page spreads, these informative works of art are sprinkled throughout each issue. Political cartoons are a classic example of editorial illustrations, but today’s publications use the work of contemporary artists to visually interpret a wide range of topics.

As editorial illustrators, our job is to create an engaging visual that both supports and explains the accompanying text copy. A successful piece carefully balances the art director’s vision with our own ideas, all while clearly communicating the article’s core idea to the reader.

These projects an exercise in creative problem solving. From the super-quick turnaround to the varied subject matter, each assignment is a new visual puzzle for us to solve.

Today, we’re going show you how we created an editorial illustration for Southwest Airlines’ in-flight magazine, Spirit. We’ll walk you through the entire illustration process, from our first client conversation to seeing our work in print.

Ready? Let’s get started!

1. Discussion & Research

gomedia-1

Each editorial illustration is a collaboration between the client and the artist, so the first step of every project is to have a conference with the magazine’s art director.

First, we discuss the topic of the piece. We’ll be creating art to accompany an article about four business tips. We’re given a preliminary page layout along with rough copy to refer to during the design process.

Next, we talk about the creative direction of the piece. After conferencing with the art director, we’re given some specific guidelines. The piece will consist of four individual illustrations, each mirroring the tall, elongated shape of the four existing columns on the page. The art director also has a fun idea: to model each individual illustration after a classic motivational poster, like these. This information, along with the article itself, gives us a great starting point as we begin the process.

2. Initial Sketch

gomedia-2

It’s time to start drawing! Since the “motivational poster” concept for this piece is already set, our goal is to come up with one solid sketch to present to the client. For projects that are more open-ended, we’ll usually come up with 3-5 different concepts during the sketch phase.

Working with the actual page layout as our guide, we use a Cintiq 13HD pen display to start laying down rough ideas for each component of the illustration in Adobe Photoshop. Using a pen display allows us to work directly inside the page layout, ensuring that our sketches are drawn at the correct size and proportion. For a more budget-friendly option, simply print the page layout on paper and use it as a template with tracing paper.

After working through a number of ideas for each individual poster, we land on this sketch as our initial concept. Each poster visually depicts the concepts of teamwork, innovation, preparation, and fairness. The article talks about the benefits and disadvantages of each business concept, so each poster will show an example of the idea both working and not working.

3. Revised Sketch

gomedia-3

Before submitting the sketch to our client, we sit down and review our work. At this stage, our primary goal is to create a piece that is both visually and conceptually strong.

During our internal review, we notice that two of the four “poster” concepts involve hands. We like that the hands introduce a human element without showing a face. Incorporating hands into all four posters also creates continuity throughout the entire piece.

We revise the drawing to reflect our new and improved concept. Each poster now feels more similar in complexity and is visually easier to read. Once we’re happy with the sketch, we paint in a few layers of gray to explore the value structure of the piece and help the client envision the final piece.

4. Client Feedback & Revisions

gomedia-4

Next, we send our sketch off to the client for review. The feedback is positive. We’re on the right track! The magazine’s art director has a suggestion for the first poster. Instead of drawing pointing fingers, what if we create a network of intertwining handshakes to represent the benefits (and pitfalls) of teamwork? We love the idea, so we hit the drawing board to create a new sketch for the first poster before we move on to the linework stage.

5. Linework

gomedia-5

Once the revised sketch is approved, it’s time to turn our rough drawing into a finished illustration. Using the sketch as a guide, we begin to draw individual elements in Adobe Illustrator. Using many of the standard shape tools coupled with the Pathfinder palette and pen tool, we begin crafting geometric hands, lightbulbs, and other items.

Where our sketching process is fluid and loose, the linework stage is methodical and meticulous. It’s a balancing act of capturing the energy of the initial sketch while cleaning it up for it’s final form.

6. Color

gomedia-6

With the linework completed, we begin to add color. In this case, the client had a rough color palette to work with, so we jumped right in and started applying color. With other projects, choosing colors is up to us, so we’ll typically do a few exploratory color studies before deciding on a final color scheme.

You’ll notice that some of the design elements changed at this stage. When we start working with color, we almost always find a few things that can be improved upon from our first pass at the linework. In this case, we changed the positioning of the lightbulb hands, added some editing marks to the papers, and drew some fun trophies to go with the medals.

7. Texture

gomedia-7

After the color is finished and we’ve made our final tweaks to the design, we jump into Photoshop to add our signature texture treatment. This final step adds dimension, contrast, and interest to the flat vector artwork.

To bring our vector art in from Illustrator, we copy and paste major element groups into a new Photoshop document as Smart Objects. Next, we use various selection tools to isolate individual colors. Finally, we use a dissolve brush, multiplied layers, and our Cintiq pen display to paint in areas of shaded color.

Here’s a before and after view of our texture treatment. The effect is subtle, but goes a long way towards making the piece feel finished.

gomedia-8

8. Submit & Wait

gomedia-9

With the texture treatment complete, we export a high-resolution version from Photoshop and send it off to the magazine, where they’ll drop it into the page layout along with the final text copy.

Now comes the hard part: waiting! Editorial deadlines tend to be a few months in advance of the publication date, so it’ll be a while before we get to see our masterpiece in print. Eventually, when the day comes, we run to our favorite bookstore, crack open that new issue, and see our work right there on the page. There’s nothing quite like it!

Psst!

Editors note: If you haven’t yet, we highly suggest you watch their highly acclaimed talk from WMC Fest!

More These Are Things | Shop | Blog | Facebook | Twitter | These Are Things Instagram | Jen’s Instagram | Omar’s Instagram
On the GoMediaZine:
WMC Fest 4 Speaker Videos Release
An Interview with Jen Adrion & Omar Noory of These Are Things
Episode 9: Myths of Owning Your Own Design Firm plus an Interview with These Are Things

The post Tutorial: The Making Of An Editorial Illustration with These Are Things appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/tutorial-the-making-of-an-editorial-illustration-with-these-are-things/feed/ 2
Tutorial: Block Print Design with Derrick Castle http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/tutorial-block-print-design-with-derrick-castle/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tutorial-block-print-design-with-derrick-castle http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/tutorial-block-print-design-with-derrick-castle/#comments Mon, 04 Nov 2013 14:00:45 +0000 Derrick Castle http://www.gomediazine.com/?p=35468 I wanted to come up with a block print design for the old American idiom “Pushing up Daisies”. I’ve actually been surprised by the number of people that haven’t heard of this old saying. Maybe it’s more of a southern thing. It means dead and buried. The elders used to claim that concentrated patches of daisies would grow over the graves of the deceased. I think it just sounds cool. For my block prints, I like to use linoleum. Linoleum is a lot easier to work with than wood. They say that the lifespan of linoleum is up to 10 years before the linoleum itself starts to degrade. I haven’t gotten to that point but my blocks are still going strong. My first step in the process of creating a design is to sketch out a simple idea. I like to keep the composition simple because I know that I’ll be carving out all the negative space and detailed illustrations for block printing can be a recipe for pain and frustration. But, by all means, push yourself. Continue Reading »

The post Tutorial: Block Print Design with Derrick Castle appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
Pushing Up Daisies: A Tutorial by Nashville based graphic designer, WMC Fest 4 artist and Ink Wars participant Derrick Castle

I wanted to come up with a block print design for the old American idiom “Pushing up Daisies”. I’ve actually been surprised by the number of people that haven’t heard of this old saying. Maybe it’s more of a southern thing. It means dead and buried. The elders used to claim that concentrated patches of daisies would grow over the graves of the deceased. I think it just sounds cool.

For my block prints, I like to use linoleum. Linoleum is a lot easier to work with than wood. They say that the lifespan of linoleum is up to 10 years before the linoleum itself starts to degrade. I haven’t gotten to that point but my blocks are still going strong.

daisies-block-product

My first step in the process of creating a design is to sketch out a simple idea. I like to keep the composition simple because I know that carving out all the negative space and detailed illustrations for block printing can be a recipe for pain and frustration. But, by all means, push yourself.

pushing-daisies-sketch-web

Another thing to keep in mind when working in a medium like block printing, this is a form of relief printing so what ever you are printing, it will be the mirror image of your design. So, it is really important, especially with typography, that you transfer the reverse of your image to the block for carving.

I typically sketch my design on tracing paper and flip it over with a sheet of carbon paper underneath. I trace and transfer the design to the block. From there, I like to ink the design onto the block so I do not get lost in the pencil lines. For this particular design, I want to print on black stock so I inked out all the negative space in which I would be carving.

daisies-block-inked

Once I have laid down my pen and ink, I get to carving. Now it is time to set it to auto pilot because you are going to be here for a while. During this process, I tend to meditate and pontificate the meaning of raisins and other unexplained phenomenon. You do want to be very patient and deliberate during this process to avoid slips of the carving tools. (If I was to give any tips at this stage; before carving, set your linoleum block under a hot lamp for a little while before carving, this will soften the linoleum making it easier to carve.)

daisies-block-carved

So now you are done carving and up until this point, because you have been working in reverse, you do not know how your prints are going to turn out. I’m always incredibly anxious to get to the printing stage because that is the moment where you find out if you have succeeded in bringing your vision to life. When printing, make sure you do use block printing ink. I use water based speedball inks, which work well for what I need. Block printing inks have a nice tacky consistency once you roll it out onto your rolling board.

For me, the printing process was actually the most difficult process to get the hang of. I spent a lot of time trying different methods of applying ink and pressing the blocks. The key to a successful print is to achieve the right texture of ink on your block. When applying the ink, it should sound a lot like Velcro. Once you have the right consistency, place your stock on top of the block and apply pressure. I work completely manual with nothing but elbow grease so, I use a rigid acrylic roller to apply even pressure to the inked block. I do not like using a baren which a lot of people recommend, it just didn’t work for me personally. After that first pressing, stand back and enjoy the fruits of your labor, over and over again. Reproducible art at its finest.

daisies-block-clipped

About the Author:

Derrick Castle is a Nashville based graphic designer and illustrator, freelancing for many major merchandising groups, as well as clothing labels. He is the creator of Straw Castle.

derrick2

More Derrick: Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | Society6 | Dribble

derrick1

Subscribe to the GoMediaZine newsletter | Get Goodies


facebooktwitterinstagramiconpinterestbehance

follow us in feedly

The post Tutorial: Block Print Design with Derrick Castle appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/tutorial-block-print-design-with-derrick-castle/feed/ 2
Let’s make a horror movie poster with vector set 23 http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/lets-make-an-horror-movie-poster-with-vector-set-23/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=lets-make-an-horror-movie-poster-with-vector-set-23 http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/lets-make-an-horror-movie-poster-with-vector-set-23/#comments Thu, 31 Oct 2013 11:30:39 +0000 Simon H. http://www.gomediazine.com/?p=35159 Boo! Happy Halloween! With the release of our latest, horror-themed, vector set, we felt it was fitting to have an Halloween tutorial. So today, we’re going to work on re-creating this poster for Dracula’s daughter, a fictitious movie from five or six decades ago. The design above was a team effort between Steve Knerem, Jeff… Continue Reading »

The post Let’s make a horror movie poster with vector set 23 appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
Boo!

Happy Halloween! With the release of our latest, horror-themed, vector set, we felt it was fitting to have an Halloween tutorial. So today, we’re going to work on re-creating this poster for Dracula’s daughter, a fictitious movie from five or six decades ago.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Base poster mockup

The design above was a team effort between Steve Knerem, Jeff Finley, and myself. As you can see, not all the details are historically accurate (actor names, type choices), there are some alignment issues, and a typo, but it’s a good base to start from.

We’ll be using Illustrator as our main tool throughout this tutorial. This will allow us to easily limit the number of colors of our final piece. This is for two reasons: we want to potentially screen print the piece, and it forces us to design more efficiently.

We’ll see how to recolor the vector elements from set 23 to match our color palette, how to place them around, how to manipulate the type to create the title elements, and more! Let’s get started, shall we?

Step zero: the layout

The first step would be to take a piece of paper and a pen, and to comp some layout options. This is also where we looked at the content of set 23, and decided which pieces to use. Steve is the one who came up with the concepts for the poster’s layout. He also fixed the poster size at 18″ by 24″. Here are a couple of the sketches he made:

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Layout sketch 01 Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Layout sketch 02 Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Layout sketch 03

As you can see, the diamond element, along with the witch’s head have been there from the start. The earlier versions of the composition were a bit busier, with a lot of elements in the bottom half of the frame. We decided to simplify things.

Since the process between Steve, Jeff, and myself was very organic, I’ll spare you the headaches of the back and forth between us. From now on, this will be written as if we started from scratch. Also, since there were so many people involved and that some of the steps haven’t been documented, we might end up with an end result slightly different from the mockup at the top.

Step one: document setup

The first step is straight forward: we need to create a new document in Illustrator. I created an 18″x24″ document, at 300 dpi and in CMYK.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Document setup

Useful goodie: here are the main colors we’ll be using.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Color palette

Step two: background elements

Main background color

After placing a series of guides (to find the middle, and get a sense of the bleed I’d like to keep), I’ve created a  new layer that I’ve named “bg elements.” I then used my rectangle tool (M) to create a centered 18″x24″ rectangle filled with a very dark gray (#121213).

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Guides and backrgound set-up

Background texture

The texture part is pretty easy: Steve created a vector texture pack as part of set 23.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Vector texture pack from set 23

I just grabbed the grunge texture in the pack, placed it in above the dark gray rectangle, sized it to fill the whole artboard, and colored it in RGB black (#000000). This way, it contrasts softly against the dark gray of our background rectangle.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Placing the background texture

The finishing touch for the texture is to hide the parts of it that extend beyond our artboard (when sized at 18″ wide, the texture is almost 26.2″ tall). We’re going to use a clipping mask for this. Just create another 18″x24″ rectangle above the texture group, center it, and remove any fill or stroke color. I’ve also renamed it to texture clipping mask. Then, select both the texture and the rectangle, right click, and select the Make clipping mask option. And you’ll have a clean looking background!

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Background texture clipping mask

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Background texture clipping mask result

Background burst

The purple burst is the focal element of the background. You’ll notice in our mockup above that the burst is grunged out by the texture. This means that we’ll have to place it between the bg and the Texture clipping group sub-layers.

In order to get a burst, we need to first create a circle. Mine is 16″ in diameter. It’s centered in the artboard, and filled in purple (#614a72).

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Background burst creation, base circle

Next, we’ll be using the Zig Zag filter to create the burst out of that circle. It’s in Effects > Distort and transform > Zig Zag. Make sure the Preview box is checked, and start tinkering with values until you get a satisfying burst. I’ve used  an absolute value of 2.5″ for the size, and 50 ridges per segment. I also chose smooth points versus corners, as it gives me a softer, more worn look.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Background burst creation, Zig Zag filter

As you can see, the burst is way too wide right now. A little bit of resizing from the center, and we’re good to go (hold SHIFT + ALT while dragging one of the corners of the bounding box inwards). You could also make your burst around 12″ wide right away.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Background burst creation, resizing

And our background is ready!

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Background burst result

Step three: assembling our main elements

Copying from the vector packs

Now that we have our background, it’s time to grab the elements we’ll be needing for the rest of the poster. I have the following:

You should note that you don’t have to use these elements for your poster design. It would be absolutely acceptable to grab some other vector elements, or to make your own, to follow along with this tutorial.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Assembling main elements

As you can see, there are some things we won’t need (the hands of the zombies, the scrolls and supporting elements of the “sexy” witch, etc). Let’s go ahead and delete these. Ungroup, use the direct selection tool if needed (A), select the parts we don’t need, and here’s the result:

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Editing elements: removing the useless extras

Preparing the portraits and the wolf ornament

I’m going to walk you through preparing the first portrait. The process will be the same for the three other ones. Let’s prepare the top left one.

You could ask, why are we modifying these? The purpose behind this modification is to have the four surrounding portraits toned down in terms of colors. This will let the center piece have much more visual impact.

First, we need a black circle we can put in the background. The head of the zombie is 2″ tall, so I made my circle 2.5″ in diameter.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Support circle

If we look at the finished product, the circle has a lighter (#232323) stroke. It also crops the portrait closer. The first thing I’ve done is to align the stroke of the circle to the inside, and to thicken it to 10 points. I’ve then resized the circle closer to the top of the head. So close in fact, that some of the hair goes over the edge of the circle.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Adding the outline

Next, and in order to simplify the recoloring process, I’ve actually used the Pathfinder to merge the head together. We could keep it un-merged, but it would make the process even longer, to figure out all the paths and to select the right ones.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Merging the zombie head

After merging, ungroup the head, and start selecting the shapes to switch them either to black for the dark parts of the face (#000000), or to dark gray (#222222). It will take a few minutes, but it’s going to be worth it! As part of the recoloring process, I’ve also recreated the pupils in the eyes with two circles. This is because the original ones are half-circles, that get deformed during the merging process anyways. Once the coloring is done, it’s time to group the head back together.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Recoloring the head Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Recoloring the head Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Recoloring the head Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Grouping the head back together

Time to clip the head within the frame we created. Unlock the background stroked circle, and make a copy of it. Then proceed to paste it in front (CTRL/CMD + F) of the original circle. Then go to Object > Expand appearance. Ungroup the result. This will allow us to select and use the inner circle as a clipping mask for the portrait. Once you’ve applied the clipping mask, the portrait is almost done!

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Preparing the clipping mask Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Preparing the clipping mask Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Preparing the clipping mask Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Preparing the clipping mask Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Portrait with the clipping mask

We now need to use elements from the wolf ornament to pimp the portrait frame a little. Following a similar process to the zombie head itself, we’ll be ungrouping the ornament, eliminating the parts we don’t want, recolorizing it, and applying it to the top and side edges. After that, we’ll be applying a stroke to all of that, to help it standing from the grunge texture of the background. See the process in pictures in pictures below:

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Adding the ornaments from the wolf piece Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Adding the ornaments from the wolf piece Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Adding the ornaments from the wolf piece Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Adding the ornaments from the wolf piece Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Adding the ornaments from the wolf piece Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Adding the ornaments from the wolf piece Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Adding the ornaments from the wolf piece Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Adding the ornaments from the wolf piece Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Adding the ornaments from the wolf piece Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Adding the ornaments from the wolf piece Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Adding the ornaments from the wolf piece Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Adding the ornaments from the wolf piece Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Adding the ornaments from the wolf piece Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Adding the ornaments from the wolf piece Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the portrait - Adding the ornaments from the wolf piece

There’s one thing that didn’t work according to plan, and it was in the next to last step. When offsetting the path of the copy (Object > Path > Offset path), the black stroke around the ornate elements was just too much. So I used my direct selection tool to delete the extra elements around them, to make it visually lighter.

Following a similar process, you can prepare the three other portraits. Or, you could dig into your layers, figure out where the zombie head clipping group is, and just swap the head out for the other portraits, so you don’t have to recreate the circle and the other elements each time. This is done by simply dragging the layers in the appropriate order and within the right groups via the layer palette.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the other portraits Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the other portraits Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the other portraits Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the other portraits Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the other portraits

In order to avoid having to recreate the frame around the head, I simply flipped it using the Transform menu available when right-clicking (Transform > Reflect). Below are a few shots of going through the remaining two portraits, as well as the wolf ornament.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the other portraits Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the other portraits Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the other portraits Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the other portraits Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the other portraits Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the other portraits Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the other portraits Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Placing the portraits Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Placing the portraits Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the wolf ornament Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the wolf ornament Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the wolf ornament Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the wolf ornament Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the wolf ornament Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the wolf ornament Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the wolf ornament

Phew, that took its sweet time. Time to get the center diamond shape prepared.

The diamond

To create the “petals”, we’ll be using two overlapping circles and a bit of Pathfinder magic. We’ll then proceed to trace the diamond shape, using our smart guides (View > Smart guides) to align its top and bottom edges with the top and bottom of the top and bottom “petal”, and its side extremities to the center of the horizontal petal line, and to the edge of the diagonal petal. I promise this makes sense in the images below (you’ll be able to see my values for size, stroke thickness, etc., in them too).

After some trickery with strokes and expanded appearances, we can recreate the same type of effect as in the original piece. It has a green outer stroke (#60806b), which also seems to merge with the petals, an inner black stroke, and an orange center (#cb7856).

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Constructing the diamond

Adding texture to the diamond

The orange part of the diamond features the hand-drawn snake skin texture that’s available in the vector texture pack. We’ll simply add this texture at the top of the diamond itself, and use a copy of the diamond path as a clipping mask. In terms of scaling the texture, it’s your call. Remember that the diamond shape will be our big, central element in the poster. So if we just size the texture to cover the diamond, it’ll be very big once blown up to its appropriate final size. I’d suggest making a collage of a couple of duplicates of the texture for a better effect. You should also consider making a couple of duplicates, then reverse the source texture to finish the texturing. This will make it look less uniform.

Because the diamond has a stroke aligned on the inside, we’ll need to expand the copy, merge it to subtract the black outline from the orange diamond, ungroup the result, and delete the black outline before being able to use it as a clipping mask. Look at the image sequence below for the step by step actions I’ve taken.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding texture to the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding texture to the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding texture to the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding texture to the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding texture to the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding texture to the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding texture to the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding texture to the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding texture to the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding texture to the diamond Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding texture to the diamond

Colorizing and including the witch in the diamond

The process to colorize the witch is very similar to the one used for the portraits: merging, ungrouping, selecting the shapes, changing the colors, etc. My goal is to keep the color palette to a minimum overall, so I’ve only introduced one more color, a dark green for the skin’s shadows (#44594a). I’m reusing the snake skin’s bright orange for her pupils and teeth. The lighter parts of her collar are that dark gray used for the portraits. I’ve also left the crystal ball as is, as I want to keep its transparency effects intact.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the witch portrait Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the witch portrait Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the witch portrait Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Preparing the witch portrait

After making sure that my witch is placed above the diamond’s layer, I just placed it on top, and decided to size it to obtain a similar crop to our original piece. The hands will be cropped by the lower edges of the diamond, and the head of the witch will come pretty close to the top edges. The cool thing is that you can move the hands apart if needed to fill the frame better, which I’ve done. After placing the witch, I just made a quick copy of the snake skin texture clipping mask to clip the witch, and it’s good for the final touches: the bats and birds. These were simply placed, duplicated and mirrored, and centered. I then colored them black for a higher contrast against that orange background.

After that assembling, I just created a copy of the diamond, witch, birds, and bats, and placed it in its own layer atop of everything else in the poster frame.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding the witch portrait Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding the witch portrait Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding the witch portrait Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding the witch portrait Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding the witch portrait Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding the witch portrait Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding the witch portrait Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding the witch portrait Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding the witch portrait Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding the witch portrait Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding the witch portrait Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Adding the witch portrait

Phew, we’re done with the bulk of this tutorial here. Now, onto the type!

Step four: type elements

There’s not too much type on this poster. Each actor portrait features the name and role. There’s a two part sub-header above the diamond. Finally, the main title is at the bottom of the diamond. The typefaces that have been used are Hitchcock, Cooper Black Std, and Coop from House Industries.

The actor name and role are very straight forward. Two different sizes of text in a lighter gray (18 and 24 points, in #323232), and done.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Portrait type Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Portrait type

The sub-headers (“What is she hiding?” and “What is her secret?”) are also quite easy. They’re written using the Hitchcock typeface. The trick with these is to use the Flag mode in the Warp filter (Effect > Warp > Flag). We’re also going to use filler characters (I’m using the underscore, but whatever works, as they’re going to be deleted) to fine tune the curve we’re giving the text.

There’s also a “shadow” effect with it. I’ve obtained it by simply duplicating my text group, and offsetting the lower group by eight arrow taps down, and eight arrow taps to the right.

The process is identical for the second sub-header, except that it’s aligned to the right, and that the text offsetting is also reversed to the left. See the image sequence below for the various values I’ve used.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Sub-headers

The big piece is the main title. It features complex layering, and a full shape outline.

There are three layers: orange, black, and green. The key to the effect is to offset the black layer less than the green one to get the uniform look. In order to obtain the full shape outline, we’re going to merge a copy of all the layers, place it in the back, and either add a stroke to it or use the offset path function. I personally prefer offset path, so that’s what I’ll show you. It’s all written in Coop Bold, and we’re using the Flag filter again (but at 15% this time). The top line is sized at 200 points, the bottom at 250 points. The line height is at 225 points.

Along the way, I also realized that beefing up some of the shapes by adding a stroke to give them more weight and smooth the overall visual balance helped. The black layer of text, the green layer of text, as well as the full shape outline all went through that treatment. In some cases, some of the letter shapes needed to be fixed once they were expanded.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Main title Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Result!

And now that that’s done, we can say it’s over!

Bonus! Step five: fake folds

To finish things off, we can add a fake folds vector element on top of everything. A long time ago, I scanned in that folded/scratched paper texture. After placing it in Ai, I live-traced it and got the following vector element:

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Folds

You just have to place that element in a new layer above your poster, drop its opacity to 50%, and you’ve got yourself fake folds!

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Folds

And because we’re in a good mood, you can even download these fake folds for your own use, in both personal and commercial projects. And while you’re at it, you should sign up on our email list to hear about all the rest of the good stuff we release on the Arsenal.

And finally, don’t forget to mock your final art up, and to show it off in the Go Media Flickr pool.

Let's make an horror movie poster with vector set 23 - Final mocked up

Well, that’s it for this tutorial. Don’t forget to check out vector set 23 on the Arsenal, and until next time, cheers!

The post Let’s make a horror movie poster with vector set 23 appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/lets-make-an-horror-movie-poster-with-vector-set-23/feed/ 2
Easy to accomplish VSCO Cam effect in Photoshop http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/easy-to-accomplish-vsco-cam-effect-in-photoshop/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=easy-to-accomplish-vsco-cam-effect-in-photoshop http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/easy-to-accomplish-vsco-cam-effect-in-photoshop/#comments Wed, 30 Oct 2013 12:30:04 +0000 Simon H. http://www.gomediazine.com/?p=34122 A little bit of context Hello all, Simon here. You know me as a designer that loves to create posters with a lot of textures. I mean, just check the Lost and Taken poster tutorial, or the Do androids dream of electric sheep one. I’ve also used similar techniques in the tutorial I wrote when… Continue Reading »

The post Easy to accomplish VSCO Cam effect in Photoshop appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
A little bit of context

Hello all, Simon here. You know me as a designer that loves to create posters with a lot of textures. I mean, just check the Lost and Taken poster tutorial, or the Do androids dream of electric sheep one. I’ve also used similar techniques in the tutorial I wrote when we released the Go Media building texture collection.

Well today, I want to talk about another one of my hobbies: photography. More specifically, iPhonography. I’m an avid Instagram user. But even better than Instagram is VSCO Cam. Purchasing the whole set of filters in that last app was so worth it. I’m a sucker for these often over-the-top film vibe images. Knowing that I don’t shoot too much film these days (despite owning a couple of Polaroids and an old Fujica ST 705), it’s kind of the closest I’m getting to it.

Been living under a rock for the past few years and don’t know what Instagram and VSCO Cam are and what they do? Here’s my Instagram profile, and my Grid™ profile. I’ve also shot images at the Cleveland  Zoo, at the Aquarium, and during Signal Midwest’s WMC Fest set.

But editing images on a small screen isn’t always the best and most practical. So, our quest today will be to create an editing workflow that brings us similar results, but by using Photoshop. I personally use Photoshop CC, but I’m fairly certain that you’ll have access to the same tools than I do starting with Ps CS3.

Oh, and it looks like the folks at VSCO Cam like it:

Let’s have a look at what kind of effect VSCO Cam produces

I’ll use some of my own images here as examples:

IMG_1258

IMG_1255

IMG_1285

Signals Midwest @ WMC Fest 2013

Signals Midwest @ WMC Fest 2013

Signals Midwest @ WMC Fest 2013

As you can see, we get a “faded” look (“crushed” colors), some grain, and some strange saturation mixed with cross-processed tones.

The faded look is the signature feature here. We’ll be exploiting the power of curves to accomplish some of that stuff. The grain can be either generated by Photoshop’s noise functionality, but we’ll probably use a real film grain and/or dust texture for added realism, and the saturation and cross-processing will be done using adjustment layers. The adjustment layer bit is crucial in order to keep a non-destructive workflow. This will allow us to, by turning a few layers off, to always get back to the original image.

Let’s get to it, shall we?

Source images

I’m using three images that I’ve grabbed from sxc.hu. They’re called Path in forest, Misty morning, and Tuscany farm and fields. I’ll start with the Tuscany image. After that, I’ll apply the same effect to the two others to see how transferable it is.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Source image - sxc.hu - 1109089_20976165 VSCO Cam tutorial - Source image - sxc.hu - 1367404_19918744 VSCO Cam tutorial - Source image - sxc.hu - 1408266_27405860

Step one:

This is very straight forward: open your image, and double click the background layer to make its own layer.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step one

Step two: lightening the image a bit

The second step consists of lightening the image a bit. You could use a Brightness/Contrast adjustment layer, but I decided to use a Curves layer instead. Curves are much more flexible and powerful.

Just click on the center point of the curve, and drag it upwards. I’ve dragged it until my input value reads 130, and my output value reaches 140.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step two

Step three: boosting the contrast

The contrast adjustment might not be necessary, depending on your starting image. Doing it here allowed to bring more intensity in the hay, and in that building in the left of the image. I could have used a curve adjustment layer to execute this step, but since I didn’t need much refinement, the Brightness/Contrast one works just fine.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step three

Step four: let’s spruce up the colors

In my opinion, here’s where we really start to “cheat” with the digital image. A lot of cheaper digital cameras have sensors that don’t render a color spectrum as extended as, say, a pricey high end DSLR. By adding a Vibrance adjustment layer, we can fix this a little. I pushed the slider to 35. If you feel happy with the color rendition of your image, feel free to skip this step.

That being said, the various films brand that became iconic rendered colors differently as well, and the specific way some of them reacted (more saturated, more green, more blue, etc.) got them really sought after.

Note: you can read much more about the vibrance functionality over here, along with visual examples.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step four

Step five: emulating the “color profile” of film

This fifth step is where we twist the colors around to give them the film feel. We’re using a Selective color adjustment layer. We’ll be touching up the yellows, the greens, the blues, and the blacks. See the values below:

  • Yellow: magenta +75, yellow +25
  • Greens: yellow +50, black +100,
  • Blues: black +25,
  • Blacks: black +10

If you know how certain type of films render colors (shadows greener, highlight yellow-ish, etc.), this would be the step to apply their “color profiles.” Looking at my result, I’m going to venture that we’re trying to emulate the M4 or M5 preset of VSCO Cam. But you should experiment here. For instance, try reducing the magenta to -25 or so in the blacks. You’ll see that your shadows will take a green-ish hue. Following that logic, you could easily recreate a lot of different color palettes.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step five

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step five

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step five

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step five

Step six: the all powerful fade

As we saw when we looked at the example images earlier, the “faded” look, with the washed out and “crunched” colors is key to emulate a VSCO Cam image. After tinkering with using the Exposure/Gamma correction adjustment layer and a Curve adjustment layer, it seemed that using a fill layer (Layer > New fill layer > Solid color) of the color #4e4e4e put on Lighten for the blending mode gave me the best result.

Want more fade? Duplicate the layer, and toy with the opacity of the copy. Want less fade? Reduce the opacity of the original layer.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step six

Step seven: a hint of cross-processed colors

Cross processing “is the procedure of deliberately processing one type of film in a chemical solution intended for another type of film. As particular chemical solutions are optimized for specific kinds of film, you will get unpredictable and interesting results when they are combined differently” (read more about real cross processing on the site of the same name or on Wikipedia).

Luckily for us, the Curves adjustment layer has a “Cross process” preset. Select it.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step seven

As you can see, the effect is quite strong. But it brings that interesting green hue in the dark and black zones of the image. To make this a bit more presentable, I just lowered the opacity of the layer to 10%.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step seven

Step eight: a bit more saturation

After all this color craziness, I’m going to add a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer to my layer stack. The slider is at 5, but this is enough to give a little “kick” to our image.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step eight

Step nine: let’s amp the temperature up

Another trick that VSCO Cam lets you do is to toy with the temperature of your image. So I went ahead and added a Photo filter adjustment layer, using the Warming filter (LBA) preset. I’ve left mine as is, but there’s plenty of head room in the Density slider and layer opacity to refine the effect. Just make sure that the Preserve luminosity checkbox is checked.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step nine

This is technically it

This is it! If you’ve followed the tutorial until now, you’ve emulated the look and feel of (one of the presets of) VSCO Cam. Just look at the source image, and at the result side by side:

VSCO Cam tutorial - Side by side comparisonBut you know me. I love texture, grain, and dust speckles too much to stop there. The next two steps, that are absolutely up to you, will show you how I added some grain and dust speckles to my image.

Step ten: grainy

As I wrote earlier, you could just fill a new layer with white or a neutral gray, and add noise to it (Filter > Noise > Add noise). But real analog grain will be so much better. So after scouring the internets for cool grain textures, I found this fantastic, high resolution one (9000 x 7200 pixels @ 300ppi) on DeviantArt, called Grain explosion. It’s been provided to us by JakezDaniel. Careful though, as it’s apparently only for non-commercial use (unless you get his permission).

The process is quite simple: import the texture in your design (File > place), and size it appropriately to cover your whole canvas. This one is so high resolution, that even at 26% percent of its size, it did the trick. Put the layer on Soft light at 15% opacity, and you’ve got yourself some sweet film grain.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step ten

Step eleven: dusty

Another bonus step is to add dust, scratches, and other artifacts to the image. Well, JakezDaniel strikes again, because he has another sweet texture in his library called Film 400TMY. Same restrictions on its use, so don’t come and pretend you’ve not been warned. This texture features some subtle grain, and plenty of speckles of all sorts of dusty goodness. I also placed it in my document, sized it at 45%, put the blending mode of the layer on Screen, and tadaa!

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step elevenAnd there you have it! First with textures, and then without them.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Final, textured

VSCO Cam tutorial - Final, no textures

Now what?

Well, the whole point is to see if this is an editing workflow that could be reused for a whole set of images. See below the before and after comparison of the other source images I’ve mentioned at the beginning. The layer stack has been moved as-is to them. The only thing that changed is how much I’ve resized the grain and dust textures. Their opacities and blending modes remain the same. These are at 100%. Just click on the image to see it in very big.

On that foggy landscape picture, you can see that the result is very satisfying. The fade works wonders, probably even too well. I suppose that the color edits could be different to fit the mood of the image better.

VSCO Cam tutorial - side by side comparisonFor our second image, the result is a bit more intense, if not too intense. So I think that the color manipulation step is going to be the one step to adapt every time to the source image.

Note: this image had to be resized down to be able to upload it through Wordpress. You can see the full size image over here.

VSCO Cam tutorial - side by side comparison

Bonus: “tilt-shift” blur

Editing images using VSCO Cam is great, but only Instagram allows you to do that quick blur effect. It can be used either to recreate that sweet “tilt-shift” effect, or to highlight a specific part of your image. After a little bit of play time with the lens blur effect and documentation reading, I think I managed to create a satisfactory Ps equivalent. In our Tuscany fields scene, we’re more going to highlight a part of the image rather than do some tilt-shift goodness.

Step one: preparing the document

The first step I’ve taken is to create a composite of all my layers so far. The shortcut for this is CTRL + ALT + SHIFT + E (CMD + OPTION + SHIFT + E if you’re on a Mac). This creates a new layer at the top of your layer stack with a merged copy of what your document looks like so far. This is an immensely useful shortcut. You’ll notice that I renamed my layer “composite.”

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step twelve

Step two: adding a layer mask

This is pretty straight forward. You can either add the layer mask from Layer > Layer mask > Reveal All, or from the handy little layer mask button at the bottom of your layer palette, with the correct layer highlighted.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step thirteen

Step three: painting the layer mask

This step is where you decide what will be blurry in your image, and what won’t. You can either use the gradient tool to paint on your layer mask, or a big, soft brush.

The gradient tool will help you to nicely emulate real depth of field. Just be remember to choose the right gradient type for the shape of blur that you’re looking to accomplish (radial or reflected). The brush will allow much more control in zoning where the blur will happen. Since my image doesn’t have a very straight line of things I’d like to highlight, the brush made sense for me over the gradient. My brush is 250 pixels wide, and its hardness is at 0%.

Time to paint away! Note that what will be white, will be blurry, and what will be black will be left  as-is. I’ve chosen to highlight that zone at the middle of the image, and to make the sky and field right in front of us blurry. I followed roughly the hills’ edges. The brush’s soft edges allow to somehow emulate a gradient. The second image highlights where the blurred out areas will be.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step fourteen

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step fourteen

Step four: lens blur!

This is where the real fun happens! Go to Filter > Blur > Lens blur. You’ll see the following screen:

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step fifteen

The following image shows my settings. I’ll explain below what they mean.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step fifteen

You obviously want to have Preview checked. It’ll allow you to see the effects of your tinkering.

The depth map part is why we actually created that layer mask before. You’ll want to use the drop-down menu to highlight Layer Mask. And at that point, you should see the blur starting to follow what you’ve painted in the layer mask. If you’ve painted in reverse (it happens often when using the gradient tool), you check the Invert box to reverse how the filter will read your layer mask.
The Blur Focal Distance slider should be set at 0. This one works as follows: 0 is in focus, 255 is fully blurry. Since we have a predefined depth map, we do have to worry too much about it.

The Iris set of settings is where you can how the blur will look like. I chose my shape to be an octagon, but I noticed that an hexagon works as well. I do believe that this emulates the shape of the shutter in a real camera, but don’t quote me on this. The Radius slider is where you’ll determine how blurry the blur gets. For this example, 15 seems just right. The Blade Curvature and Rotation sliders produced very subtle changes when I played with them. I assume that would be where you could recreate the “profile” of a lens and/or of a shoot’s circumstances by matching its physical characteristics.

The Spectacular highlights settings are where to tinker if you want to play with bokeh. They seemed to me to react exponentially rather than in a linear fashion, so I’d say they are to be used with caution.

Noise is pretty straight forward. It adds noise to the blurry part of the image. I chose to put that slider to 2, and to have the distribution set on Gaussian. You could have some RGB noise in there, but Monochromatic looks better in my opinion.

Once you’re happy with the settings, time to hit that OK button at the top and to render the lens blur effect.

Tadaa!

And we’re done. Let’s not forget to turn the layer mask off (Right click > Disable layer mask) to truly appreciate the result.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step sixteen

One thing that I’m noticing now is that the blur also blurred the dust and other film artifacts that I’ve added to the image with the help of the textures from JakezDaniel. The solution is quite easy: let’s recreate my composite layer in order to only include the stack of adjustment layers, and not the two texture layers, copy the layer mask over, and re-apply the lens blur effect with the same settings. And here you’ll have a lens blur effect and preserved textural effects.

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step seventeen

Something to note is that how the layer mask looks like is really what makes or breaks the effect. My painting was really rough and quick, mostly to demonstrate the effect. A more refined job would have made things a bit more subtle and believable. A gradient truly is what will emulate depth of field the best. Here’s a visual demonstration of this:

VSCO Cam tutorial - Step eighteen

It’s a bit softer, and much more believable.

On that note…

That’s all for today folks! If you have suggestions, comments, or ideas to perfect this, please let me know in the comments. And don’t forget to share the results of your experiments in the Go Media Flickr pool!

The post Easy to accomplish VSCO Cam effect in Photoshop appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/easy-to-accomplish-vsco-cam-effect-in-photoshop/feed/ 19
Happy Dog Illustration and Design Tutorial http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/happy-dog-illustration-and-design/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=happy-dog-illustration-and-design http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/happy-dog-illustration-and-design/#comments Wed, 25 Sep 2013 13:00:29 +0000 Lucy Williams http://www.gomediazine.com/?p=28457 Today's tutorial comes from Weapons of Mass Creation 2013 designer and fellow Clevelander Lucy Williams. Lucy is a freelance illustrator and a recent graduate of the Cleveland Institute of Art. Follow her process as she designs a poster for local Cleveland favorite hangout, Happy Dog. Continue Reading »

The post Happy Dog Illustration and Design Tutorial appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
A Local Cleveland Business Promotional Poster Design

Today’s tutorial comes from Weapons of Mass Creation 2013 designer and fellow Clevelander Lucy Williams. Lucy is a freelance illustrator and a recent graduate of the Cleveland Institute of Art. Follow her process as she designs a poster for local Cleveland favorite hangout, Happy Dog.

Tools and Technologies You’ll Need

Micron Pens
Clearprint Vellum Paper
Exacto Blade
Electric Eraser
Adobe Photoshop 5.5
Adobe InDesign 5.5
Scanner

Clear Your Mind and Your Workspace

I always start a new project with a clean workspace.  It may not seem like an important step to mention, but I like to not only clear my head but also the space I work in.  This allows me to breathe freely and get my creative juices flowing without outside clutter taking over my work area.

HAPPYDOG_PROCESS (1)

Reference and Inspiration

If you have good reference it usually means you’ll have a pretty good final product.  I always try to do as much research as I can before I start on a project.  This means gathering photos, information, and in this case actually visiting Happy Dog to take my own pictures.

HAPPYDOG_PROCESS (2)

Sketches, Ideas and Ideations

These are my original scanned images that were done on vellum paper with a fine tipped micron pen (my favorite materials to use). A lot of times I sketch out rough drawings that I don’t even end up using. Like the dog image here, I didn’t even end up using. I decided he was too literal and the image didn’t need him.

HAPPYDOG_PROCESS (3)

Draw and Scan

I wanted to have this poster pretty cluttered because the Happy Dog is full of cool old stuff, music, all walks of life, music, art and fun! After scanning my original images, I then separated each image and individually cleaned them up in Photoshop, saving each image out as a PNG file with no background.

HAPPYDOG_PROCESS (4)

Choosing the Right File Format

After scanning, cleaning up, and perfecting each individual image, I save them each as PNG files. I choose a PNG format because they have no background and can be easily positioned in InDesign without trouble.

HAPPYDOG_PROCESS (5)

Images saved as PNGs

Organization and Composition

When I got into InDesign I placed each image into my workspace and organized them. (Most designers might use Photoshop for this step – but I like InDesign better.) Keeping images separated allowed me to make adjustments as needed. When I was finished organizing – I saved the image out as a JPG and moved them into Photoshop.

HAPPYDOG_PROCESS (6)

Images 1/ Exported, 2/ Saved as JPEGs

This is what the no color version looked like in Photoshop:

HAPPYDOG_PROCESS (7)

Textures and Background

I am a huge fan of textured backgrounds. Mainly because I like making my work appear as if it could have been done completely tactile.  You can scan textures into Photoshop or create textured brushes.  I found this one on the Internet; it’s concrete.  I flattened the image and did a little editing to soften it up. I then placed it behind my image to create a nice textured gritty look to my poster.

HAPPYDOG_PROCESS (8)

Texture on Layer 0

Color and Corrections

Coloring this poster was really fun! I knew I wanted a nice mixture between bright and subdued colors, so I went for bright pink and dull blue.  In order to get the textured background on my colored image, I flattened the background and began to fill in the places I thought needed colored. In order to get different shades of pink, I brought the opacity down on my color swatches and used different tolerance levels to get the gritty look I wanted. Playing with different levels is also a good way to bring up the saturation of your colors.  I also used the levels tool (command L) as a final step to get my colors just where I wanted them.

HAPPYDOG_PROCESS (9)

Playing with color

Color Tests:

HAPPYDOG_PROCESS (10)

Here is the final result!

HAPPYDOG_PROCESS (11)

Printed Digital Artwork!

HAPPYDOG_PROCESS (13)

HAPPYDOG_PROCESS (14)

 Learn more about Lucy!

Lucy Williams | Lucy Williams Tumblr
| Lucy’s Happy Dog Project on Behance

Subscribe to the GoMediaZine newsletter


facebooktwitterinstagramiconpinterestbehance

follow us in feedly

The post Happy Dog Illustration and Design Tutorial appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/happy-dog-illustration-and-design/feed/ 2
How to Design an Iconic and Memorable Band Logo http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/how-to-design-occult-looking-band-logo/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=how-to-design-occult-looking-band-logo http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/how-to-design-occult-looking-band-logo/#comments Wed, 11 Sep 2013 13:00:12 +0000 Jeff Finley http://www.gomediazine.com/?p=29890 My new (pop punk) band Campfire Conspiracy was gearing up to play our first show and I had two weeks to finally come up with a logo and get it stenciled or painted onto our bass drum. We had a demo coming out in only one week and we still didn’t have a logo. I’d been… Continue Reading »

The post How to Design an Iconic and Memorable Band Logo appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
My new (pop punk) band Campfire Conspiracy was gearing up to play our first show and I had two weeks to finally come up with a logo and get it stenciled or painted onto our bass drum. We had a demo coming out in only one week and we still didn’t have a logo. I’d been putting it off, but now was the time. I needed to have something before we finally went live.

Side note: Check out my other tutorial on designing custom die-cut stickers.

What followed was actually a very interesting logo design process that started from absolute scratch. I had zero idea of what I wanted our logo to look like. Should it be a campfire with some grunginess to it to show that we’re a punk band? I didn’t have an answer. I thought about it for weeks, but nothing inspired me so I went to Twitter and Facebook.

But first, here is the final logo I ended up with.

campfireconspiracy_logo

Process Documentary

If you don’t want to read the post, you can always watch this awesome video made by my friend Keith at Jakprints.

Step 0: Research (Ask Facebook)

facebook feedback

I got a reply from a fellow designer Jason Carne who suggested something minimal and occult. I was immediately drawn to this idea and when he sent me an example, I knew this was it. He even drew up a quick sketch of a campfire with a book and a tent and said, “something like this.” Hell yeah.

jason carne sketch

Original sketch by Jason Carne inspired the idea for the Campfire Conspiracy Logo

Ok, I was inspired. I knew I wanted something minimal and occult; but bands with logos like that tend to be metal, right? We were pop punk, how do I communicate that?

I didn’t know much about occult symbolism, hieroglyphics, sigils, alchemy, runes or anything. I went Googling and came up with all kinds of cool stuff. I started making a Pinterest board to archive my inspirations. I searched Pinterest and found even more cool images. I even looked at books referencing occult symbolism, conspiracies, the Illuminati, the Freemasons, etc.

occult symbols

I realized I was deep in the rabbit hole once I got to Aleister Crowley, sacred geometry, and mysticism. I even received messages from people on Facebook telling me to be careful with what I research, I might disturb something in the ether! Ok enough research, time to make something cool!

occult symbols and logos

Step 1: Sketching

I had boards and boards of inspiration and I knew enough to just start drawing. I spent a few hours at a coffee shop sketching and sketching. Drawing symbol after symbol until my hands were too cramped up to go any further.

I stared at my sketches and nothing was sticking out. I was paralyzed with doubt and fear about how this symbol might be perceived. Was it clear enough? Was it too obscure? Or not obscure enough? Are people going to think we’re devil worshipers? Haha. (My Mom even expressed concern for me).

campfire conspiracy sketches

Since I couldn’t decide, I went to social media again. I posted my sketches to get some feedback, and boy did I get it. Designers and non-designers alike were offering their two cents. They tried to tell me which one they preferred and it was clear that a few different sketches were standing out. I understood what was getting a reaction out of people and this is where I decided to take the next step and go into the computer and work on cleaner vector versions.

Step 2: Refinement

I took the basic concept and worked on multiple permutations from overly detailed to extremely minimal. How much could I get away with? If I took away too many elements, did it still communicate Campfire Conspiracy clearly? Do I even need to be literal at all? I wasn’t sure. I couldn’t decide for myself. I had such a good response from posting my sketches online so I decide to post my refinements online as well. This time I made it easier for people to tell me which ones they preferred by labeling each one.

original vector concepts for the campfire conspiracy logo

Designers’ Tip: Creating this logo was not technically hard from an execution standpoint. It’s all just one uniform stroke weight with basic circles, lines, and squares with nice alignment and symmetry. I never used the pen tool once. However, I did make sure my angles were geometrically sound.  Meaning sums of 30, 60, 90, etc. Or all evenly divisible by 360. The fire was created using the Zig Zag effect under “Distort & Transform.” 

I posted this to Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Dribbble. And after a day of feedback I tallied up the results. Over 130 votes in all and there were a few clear winners. People preferred the symbol inside a shape – whether it was a square, diamond, or circle, it didn’t seem to matter. Curiously, the more detailed it was, the more people liked it. Which went against my intuition for a logo – it felt more like a badge at that point. But still, it was very simple and iconic and not overly illustrious.

Step 3: More Refinement

So I took the clear winners from that round and posted ONE final round. I gathered the top five concepts and put them up online and people were more than happy to provide their opinion. Each of these concepts were very similar, but there emerged one clear winner. The logo with the circle around it was definitely the most popular one. And I agreed.

top five campfire conspiracy logos

The Final Logo and Beyond

I went back into Illustrator knowing exactly what I needed to do. This was an amazing feeling knowing that I was working on the right logo and wasn’t guessing. Sure, putting your logo design out there for fan feedback isn’t always the best idea but I think it worked here. I was curious along with my audience. I loved having them give a hand in the process.

I made a few refinements to the symmetry and balance of the logo and voila, I was done. I added a roughen filter to give it a slightly grungy look which fit with our band. It’s so subtle you barely notice it.

Campfire Conspiracy logo

The final logo with some additional decoration

Concerns

I had some doubts about the logo being too metal or dark when we play catchy pop punk songs like early Blink-182. I asked Adam Garcia, the designer who worked on the alternative hip hop artist Astronautalis (both are appearing at WMC Fest 2013) - who happened to develop some occult looking symbolism for him. He said it doesn’t matter if it crosses or bends genre stereotypes. People are too stuck into “this is what hip hop is supposed to look like” – you know, with graffiti, bling letters, or this and that. Just do whatever the fuck you want he said. That’s some advice I can get behind!

So I didn’t worry about it anymore after that. In fact, as long as I stood away from making it too black and white and made sure to use some color, I think it would steer clear from an obvious metal perception. The truth is, nobody cares about my band anyway, so does it even matter? Just do whatever the fuck* you want.

Expletives are for emphasis. Seriously, I mean it.

campfire conspiracy stickers

a set of four stickers

The Logo Makes its Live Debut!

Once the logo was designed, I literally had two days before our first show and needed to replace the bass drum head that still had the old band’s logo on it. We spray painted it black and when it dried I got some acrylic paint and a brush and went to town. I thought it would be a piece of cake painting the symbol onto the drum head. It was harder than I thought it would be!

Campfire Conspiracy bass drum

The Campfire Conspiracy logo makes it’s live debut! That’s me on the drums.

I took a black marker after the white paint dried and touched up the sloppy edges. In the end it came out slightly imperfect, but that was ok. To me it still felt authentic and true to the cult-like idea of the logo. If a regular person (not a trained artist) was recreating this logo, it would never be perfect.

DIY Music Video

Shirts and Hoodies!

The fine folks at Jakprints demonstrated their one color silk screen t-shirts by printing this logo onto some shirts and hoodies. Here are some pics!

Buy Hoodie

cc_hoodie

cc_shirt1

cc_shirt2

Sticker Time!

I sent the designs off to Sticker Robot and was hoping I could get some custom die cut stickers made. I didn’t want just one sticker on a sheet, I wanted four. In a diamond shape! So I set up my design file with how I wanted my stickers arranged. They ended up giving me feedback on my bleeds and after a few adjustments I got the spacing worked out just right. That’s how cool these Sticker Robot people are, I didn’t know how to set up my file and they were willing to help me out to make my dream come true. Awesome.

Buy this sticker $0.50 each!

IMG_5937 (Large)

cc_sticker1

cc_sticker2

Stenciling!

I sent off the design to Jeff Nemecek at Purebuttons/Standout Stickers and he used a robotic laser cutter to make a couple stencils for us. Now the trick to making a stencil work from your logo is putting in the “bridges.” It’s kind of hard to explain, but this tutorial on Abduzeedo does it so much better.

cc_stencil_drb

cc_stencil_in-use

cc_stencil_on-cardboard

Wrap up

A cult symbol should be intentionally easy to create but hard to forget. Something people could easily draw themselves to communicate that they were part of the cult. While our band certainly doesn’t have a cult following (yet!) it was extremely fun to experiment with something like this and equally cool printing up some band merch. I learned a lot about occult symbolism, storytelling, and not giving a fuck. I think this project was a success. I hope you can learn from it!

Connect with us:

Subscribe to the GoMediaZine newsletter


facebooktwitterinstagramiconpinterestbehance

follow us in feedly

The post How to Design an Iconic and Memorable Band Logo appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/how-to-design-occult-looking-band-logo/feed/ 9
Dust, speckles, and noise http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/dust-speckles-and-noise/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=dust-speckles-and-noise http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/dust-speckles-and-noise/#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2013 14:00:22 +0000 Simon H. http://www.gomediazine.com/?p=32757 Finally! Hello all, Simon here. The product we’re launching today is something I’ve been wanting to launch for a LONG while. Behold, Dustin’s film textures pack! A bit of background Why am I excited? Well, since we’ve (finally?) passed the extreme grunge trend, resources for subtle worn effects are what’s awesome. Believe it or not,… Continue Reading »

The post Dust, speckles, and noise appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
Finally!

Hello all, Simon here. The product we’re launching today is something I’ve been wanting to launch for a LONG while. Behold, Dustin’s film textures pack! Dustin's Film Textures Pack

A bit of background

Why am I excited? Well, since we’ve (finally?) passed the extreme grunge trend, resources for subtle worn effects are what’s awesome. Believe it or not, quality ones are not always easy to find. Anyways. One of the ways to get some subtle grunge effects is to use these film textures. They will bring you three things at once:

  • grain, from the film itself (100% analog awesomeness)
  • dust, because we love anything that will make that clean, digital feel disappear
  • speckles, to make things look less perfect

The other cool thing that comes with a film texture is a light effect of some sort. I’ve been scouring the web for textures like these A LOT. And I’ve found some. But for one, their licence restrictions are not the most practical. And then, always using the same three textures gets old. So I decided to tap on the shoulder of our contributors, and to see if they could help to add some of these awesome textures to the Arsenal. And Dustin Schmieding answered to the call! You know, the guy from Valleys in the Vinyl who brought us the Microscopic Fingerprints Texture Pack (among other things)?

The pack

The pack contains 23 amazing textures. Look at these beauties:

Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures PackDustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures PackDustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack Dustin's Film Textures Pack

All of these could be printed at 24″x36″ and beautifully ornate a wall, don’t you think?

How to use them

There are multiple ways to use these textures. Let me show you a few of them.

Overlaying them together

Let’s have a look at the visuals I came up with for the box, Zine header, etc. This is a screenshot of my file for the Zine header: gma-dustin-film-textures-gmz-header-deocnstruction-01You’ll see that most of the design is made up by the 3 textures in the bg layer group. The main trick was to put GoMediaArsenal_FilmNoise_20.jpg on top of GoMediaArsenal_FilmNoise_19.jpg, and to change its blending mode to exclusion, at 25% opacity. It was also flipped, in order to orient the stripes it’s made of towards the right rather than the left. As I wrote earlier, the textures are already looking amazing on their own, so I didn’t need to add grain, other colors, or anything, really. gma-dustin-film-textures-gmz-header-deocnstruction-02

Blacking them out

The more observant of you will notice that there’s one last texture on top of everything, GoMediaArsenal_FilmNoise_02.jpg. Well, that one is here for added speckles, mostly visible on the right side of the image. The process for that one is quite simple. See below:

1. Desaturate (CTRL/CMD + SHIFT + U)

Dustin's Film Textures Pack gma-dustin-film-textures-gmz-header-deocnstruction-03

2. Play with levels

This is the crucial step. What we want is to isolate these white speckles, hairs, and pieces of dust present on the film. These should be as white as possible, while the rest of the image should be as black as possible. We’ll then place that on top of our two background layers, and use the screen blending mode. This will only show the white elements of the layer, while the black ones will be displayed as transparent. See my Levels palette settings and my layer palette below: gma-dustin-film-textures-gmz-header-deocnstruction-04 gma-dustin-film-textures-gmz-header-deocnstruction-05 Here’s also a view of without and with the GoMediaArsenal_FilmNoise_02.jpg texture:

gma-dustin-film-textures-gmz-header-deocnstruction-06 I hope this makes better sense to you now.  I haven’t had many chances to play with these since I just got them a couple days ago, but I’m sure that the light bokehs and other halos could play nicely in many compositions, to give them that nostalgic and eerie vibe.

Where to buy?

On the Arsenal, of course!

Doing something with these textures?

Feel free to share them in the Go Media Flickr pool! We’ve brought the Flickr pool showcase back!

The post Dust, speckles, and noise appeared first on GoMediaZine.

]]>
http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/dust-speckles-and-noise/feed/ 0