Design insights & tutorials.

A Designer’s Guide to Pricing

design pricing

A lot of designers ask us what they should charge for their services. I thought I would share with you some financial lessons I’ve learned while building Go Media.

And be sure to check out “How to Charge For Your Graphic Design Work (& Get What You Deserve)” – another post by Go Media, for more on this topic!

This article will cover:
What should I charge?
Flat rate or hourly billing?
How can I avoid being stiffed?
Should I have contracts?
Avoiding “Busters”
Do I need an accountant?
What’s a “Kill Fee”?
Pitching.
How do I send invoices and track sales?

What should I charge?

hi_fi_by_gomedia.jpgThis largely depends on how skilled you are and how many customers you have. Obviously, when you’re starting out you’ll be charging almost nothing. When Go Media started I was charging flat-rates. For example – I was charging $100 to design a flyer. I would spend two days (20+ hours) doing an elaborate illustration for the flyer. So, basically I was making about $5/hr. This sucks, but I was doing what I loved.

Now obviously, with me putting in so much work and charging so little, word got around fast. Soon I had all the $100 flyer jobs that I could handle. So, I raised my price… $150, $175, $200, $300. Every time I was slammed with work I would up my price. I think this is a really good strategy for the designer that is just starting out: start with really low rates and when you get busy enough increase the amount you charge.

You will lose some customers when you raise your rates. But if you want to survive in the long-run you can’t make it charging $5/hr. Currently Go Media charges $100/hr for print design and $125/hr for web and multimedia work.

Flat Rate vs. Hourly Billing.

hindu_by_gomedia.jpgWhen we started I was really in love with the concept of Flat-Rate billing. It seemed very clear and simple to me. I know that when I am buying something – I like to know what I’m going to pay up-front. And, so long as my prices were really low it worked out fairly well. Let’s take a logo design for instance. When I started I charged $300 for a logo. Most people thought this was a fair rate and I got lots of work. Some of those logo projects, however, took a really long time. As I began working with larger and larger companies they wanted more concepts, more revisions, more discussion about their logo. Obviously – a company’s brand is VERY important. Cost is not a deterrent for these larger companies. So, of course, my price kept going up. Soon, I was charging $900 for a logo. This was a fair price for a big company that wanted lots of concepts and revisions. But for the little guy, I would practically knock them off their feet when I told them I was charging $900 for a logo. They would say: “900 DOLLARS??!! All I want is a little logo – it will only take you an hour!” And they were right. I COULD design them a logo in about an hour.

This is where the flaws in the flat-rate billing system begin to surface. What does a “logo” really mean? I could spend 1 hour on a logo and I could also spend 50 hours on a logo. So you either create a crazy scale of products like “simple logo design,” “Average logo design,” “Complex logo design” and “Ultimate logo design” OR you switch to hourly billing.

In the end we decided to switch to hourly billing. This IS how most service industry firms work. If someone asks for a flat-rate we don’t turn them down, we just talk about their project and get all the details before we give them a rate.

How can I avoid Being Stiffed?

monster_music_by_gomedia.jpgOver the years, particularly in the early years, I got stiffed a lot. Eventually I found one little trick that prevented this from happening:

Require a deposit before you begin work.

It’s simple: if someone wants to hire you for a $300 project, tell them you require a $150 deposit before you start. That’s it.

This one little step will eliminate 95% of people that will eventually stiff you.

I usually will try to get a 50% deposit before I start, then they make the final payment when I’m done. If the project is really big then I will reduce the deposit to 33% or 25%. If someone wants to take advantage of you, they don’t want to make any payment at all. By requiring a payment up-front you scare off the jerks. If someone balks at making a deposit, they probably never wanted to pay you a dime in the first place. Be happy they are leaving your life. You’re better off for it.

One exception to this is working with big corporations. If Pepsi says: “Bill us, we will pay you in 30 days.” I would tend to believe them. If they stiff you, go get a lawyer and sue them. They have lots of money and the lawyers would love to help you sue Pepsi (for the record: Pepsi has ALWAYS paid us.) Which brings me right to my next topic:

Should I have contracts?

negativeland_by_gomedia.jpgMy quick answer is: Skip the contracts for little fish and small projects, have contracts for big fish and huge clients.

A contract is only good if you can enforce what it says. Lets say, for instance, that you design a $300 flyer for a nightclub owner and you make him sign a contract. Then let’s say he stiffs you. What now? Do you wave the contract in his face and say: “Or Else!” No, you go to court – which I have done in exactly this scenario. And when you get to court, the very first thing the judge will say to you, as he did in my case is: “The court is not a collection agency. You have to collect this money on your own.” So, the club owner never shows up and you win the case. Now what? Well, you can go back to the club owner and say: “HA! I won the court case – now pay up!” And he’ll probably laugh at you. If you go to a professional collection agency they won’t touch anything for less than a few thousand dollars. And if they DO succeed at collecting any money they will keep at least 60% of it.

So, now you’ve spent all the time writing the contract, going to court, hiring a collection agency and sleepless nights worrying about this bum, and for what? You still probably get stiffed.

This is what happens when you’re dealing with little fish. The scenario changes when you’re working with bigger companies and bigger projects. Obviously, if you’ve been hired to do a $200,000.00 project – you might want to get a contract written up. You’ll want this because 1. You probably have a lot more at risk. You may need to devote months of your time to the project, hire more staff and buy equipment. And 2. In the event that you are stiffed there will be lawyers willing to help you collect. In which case, they will be able to get good use out of a contract in a trial. Go Media will only mess with contracts for projects over 50k.

Other tips to avoiding Busters

joystick_by_gomedia.jpg“Busters” is the term I use for people that have no money and want you to do work for them. They will do everything in their power to convince you that their idea is the next big thing. They will promise you great riches, fame and success beyond your wildest dreams. If you’ll just do this first job for free they will pay you triple on the next job. Or, if you do the design – they’ll pay with royalties when their product starts flying off the shelves.

Guess what? It will never happen. 99.9% of the time you will be stiffed. On the off chance that one of these buster DOES make some money – you won’t see a dime. He will stop answering your calls, stop answering your e-mails and find himself some other sucker to work for free.

Be wary of clients that are hyper active with energy and try to get you pumped up about their business, but have no up-front money to pay you. If they offer you part ownership in their company – but YOU do all the work, that’s a bad deal. If they offer you a part ownership in exchange for your services I would say: “Why don’t you pay me for a few projects so we can see if we work well together?” Anyone that is serious about having you as a business partner will think this is a good idea.

Do I need an accountant?

white_rabbit_by_gomedia.jpgYes. I highly recommend getting a good accountant involved in your business as soon as possible. I know that starting out you probably can’t afford one. That’s fine. Make due by flying “under the radar.” But once you have enough money – get yourself a really good accountant. Their advice is priceless. You don’t want to end up the next Enron.

What’s a “Kill Fee”?

fat_tuesday_by_gomedia.jpgSometimes a client will pay you to create concepts that they may not use. That payment is called a kill fee. If they decide to use your concepts they will pay you more money. This often happens when a company needs to pitch your work to their customer. We run into this a lot with the t-shirts we design. A merchandising company will want to pitch a line of t-shirts to Metallica. They will pay us a kill fee for some designs, pitch them to Metallica, then pay us more for the designs Metallica likes.

Working for a kill fee is just a matter of preference. Go Media tries to avoid kill fees. We would rather be paid in full for our time. But if someone brings you a project that you’re really excited about, you may be ok accepting the risk that the kill fee is all you’ll get.

Pitching

free_times_by_gomedia.jpgPitching is when you create a design for free, show it to the client and hope they’ll pay you for it. In truth, Go Media does not pitch very much, but that is starting to change. I know that the large advertising companies work in this way. They create entire marketing campaigns then pitch them. These pitches are usually with large companies and winning a contract will result in MILLIONS of dollars of business. SO, obviously it’s worth it for them to invest the time and money to pitch.

Pitching is also a matter of preference. It’s a great way to introduce yourself to a company or to break into a new industry. Obviously there are risks (that you’ll not get paid for your efforts), so weigh those against the opportunity to land a savory job.

How do I send invoices and track sales?

frogmen_by_gomedia.jpgGo Media uses Quickbooks. This is a somewhat complex piece of financial software, but it’s great. It takes a while to learn, but it’s well worth it in the end. Don’t try to understand all of it at once… just learn as you go. Start by focusing on how to generate an invoice. Little by little you’ll learn more over time. Your accountant can help you too once you have one. Quickbooks even offers credit card processing for a small fee.

Well, that’s it for now. If you have other specific questions I’ll try to answer them in the comments section. Subscribe to our blog so you don’t miss helpful future articles. As Ross would say: “Have a blessed day.”

About the Author, William Beachy

I grew up in Cleveland Hts. Ohio and was drawing constantly. As a child I took art classes at the Cleveland Institute of Art and eventually became known as the "class artist." I graduated from The Ohio State University's department of Industrial Design. I have always tried to blend my passion for illustration with Graphic Design. Go Media was the culmination of my interests for both business and art. I'm trying to build a company that is equally considerate of our designers AND our clients.
Discover More by William Beachy

Discussion

We want to hear what you have to say. Do you agree? Do you have a better way to approach the topic? Let the community know by joining the discussion.

  • justin

    really good insight on this piece… thanks for sharing!

  • justin

    really good insight on this piece… thanks for sharing!

  • http://www.sosnewbie.com Sergio Ordoñez

    Very good article, congrats :)

  • http://www.sosnewbie.com Sergio Ordoñez

    Very good article, congrats :)

  • cosasnotansimples

    Great article Bill… as always GoMedia shares the knowledge… the real knowledge…

    Greetings…

  • Genozider

    Do you start Go Media alone?

  • Penter

    Very Very Good article, I think it is not only for designers, but for all those who start their own business, thx so much!!!

  • Penter

    Very Very Good article, I think it is not only for designers, but for all those who start their own business, thx so much!!!

  • http://www.biklopsdesign.com BiKlops

    How do you ever even get invited to pitch?

  • http://www.biklopsdesign.com BiKlops

    How do you ever even get invited to pitch?

  • http://www.myspace.com/majicconcepts Majic Concepts

    The gradual transition from flat rate to hourly billing is exactly what I’ve done. Of course, where I live, the cost of living is quite low as is the minimum wage rate, so I’ve had to adjust my old price schedule to reflect the economy of where I am currently based. All in all, it has worked out to my advantage. I still do flat rate billing for really small stuff that I do, of course.

  • http://www.myspace.com/majicconcepts Majic Concepts

    The gradual transition from flat rate to hourly billing is exactly what I’ve done. Of course, where I live, the cost of living is quite low as is the minimum wage rate, so I’ve had to adjust my old price schedule to reflect the economy of where I am currently based. All in all, it has worked out to my advantage. I still do flat rate billing for really small stuff that I do, of course.

  • Musashi

    Thx for info, experiences, and all the rest: like a path. I appreciate your passion. i rest tuned.

    ..:: Musashi ::..

  • cosasnotansimples

    Great article Bill… as always GoMedia shares the knowledge… the real knowledge…

    Greetings…

  • Genozider

    Do you start Go Media alone?

  • Musashi

    Thx for info, experiences, and all the rest: like a path. I appreciate your passion. i rest tuned.

    ..:: Musashi ::..

  • G Gallardo

    Thank you, great info to have like guide. They will never lack those busters and “Stiffers”, but at least it is a good idea to avoid some.
    Have a great day and the best inspiration…

  • G Gallardo

    Thank you, great info to have like guide. They will never lack those busters and “Stiffers”, but at least it is a good idea to avoid some.
    Have a great day and the best inspiration…

  • dodo

    900 dollars for a logo..wow that’s some good money right there

  • dodo

    900 dollars for a logo..wow that’s some good money right there

  • Rai

    Great article!!
    You guys are truly helpful.

  • Rai

    Great article!!
    You guys are truly helpful.

  • http://www.blog.spoongraphics.co.uk Chris

    Fantastic article, some very useful info!

  • http://www.blog.spoongraphics.co.uk Chris

    Fantastic article, some very useful info!

  • drew

    Very good article! It hit on all the points of starting a small design business. It’d be nice to see it a step further in how to grow as a company, such as hiring employees/freelancers and marketing.

  • drew

    Very good article! It hit on all the points of starting a small design business. It’d be nice to see it a step further in how to grow as a company, such as hiring employees/freelancers and marketing.

  • http://www.gomedia.us Bill

    Technically I didn’t start Go Media alone. But, I had started my previous design firm alone. I then merged my one-man design firm with another one-man design firm to form Go Media. So, there was actually two of us when we got the company started.

    I think it’s rare to find a good partner right off the bat. I got lucky.

    And There is a huge advantage to having two people working together vs. just being on your own. It allows you to split the labor in half. Instead of both of us having to do the books – one of us can focus on doing the finances. It makes the company more efficient.

  • http://www.gomedia.us Bill

    Technically I didn’t start Go Media alone. But, I had started my previous design firm alone. I then merged my one-man design firm with another one-man design firm to form Go Media. So, there was actually two of us when we got the company started.

    I think it’s rare to find a good partner right off the bat. I got lucky.

    And There is a huge advantage to having two people working together vs. just being on your own. It allows you to split the labor in half. Instead of both of us having to do the books – one of us can focus on doing the finances. It makes the company more efficient.

  • http://www.aptdesignonline.com brad

    Thanks for the advice and tips. I like your hourly billing ideas, as I have run into the same problems with logos.

  • http://www.aptdesignonline.com brad

    Thanks for the advice and tips. I like your hourly billing ideas, as I have run into the same problems with logos.

  • http://www.bartondamer.com barton damer

    has anyone ever delt with royalties or a form of it for pricing? for example, a tee that is being designed for a band and they are going to sell several hundred – if not a thousand (as opposed to 75 -100 short run). i’ve toyed with the flat rate/hourly rate… but thought it seemed fair for the design to cost $1/shirt on orders over 200. that way if they sell a thousand of those tees… i’m not just getting $200 for the design. know what i mean?

    any thoughts?

  • http://www.bartondamer.com barton damer

    has anyone ever delt with royalties or a form of it for pricing? for example, a tee that is being designed for a band and they are going to sell several hundred – if not a thousand (as opposed to 75 -100 short run). i’ve toyed with the flat rate/hourly rate… but thought it seemed fair for the design to cost $1/shirt on orders over 200. that way if they sell a thousand of those tees… i’m not just getting $200 for the design. know what i mean?

    any thoughts?

  • http://www.gomedia.us Jeff

    If you have a way of making sure you get your royalties then I don’t see why it’s a bad idea. But that’s the thing, I’ve done the whole royalty thing, and even signed a contract. I never saw a dime. How is some band going to remember to pay a graphic designer when they have so many other things to worry about. It’s just not worth it unless they’re good friends of yours and you know they would pay.

  • http://www.gomedia.us Jeff

    If you have a way of making sure you get your royalties then I don’t see why it’s a bad idea. But that’s the thing, I’ve done the whole royalty thing, and even signed a contract. I never saw a dime. How is some band going to remember to pay a graphic designer when they have so many other things to worry about. It’s just not worth it unless they’re good friends of yours and you know they would pay.

  • Greg

    Everything in this piece is absolutely dead on. Starting out you will make very little, generally. Talk to non-profits/museums/galleries if you’re breaking in for work, as often they will give you great portfolio experience even if there’s little/no money. Don’t ever use spec work in your portfolio. And absolutely avoid busters… if you ever hear “we’re just starting out, but this will be great experience for you” then RUN. And never, ever participate in “logo contest” work. Google that one. I would also say it depends where you live. I’m in Los Angeles, and won
    ‘t work for under 50/hr. This rate was halved in other places I lived. If you can work for a company not in your area, great. But never lowball yourself. If you really really want to work for a certain client and get that portfolio experience, then you can always highball, but if they’re considering other designers, say “I’m really excited to be working with YOU and I’m willing to negotiate if your budget restricts my bid”. Good luck everyone.

  • Greg

    I thought I would add another thought, as this article refers to logo creation. Hehe yeah, I always here companies say “but it’s just a little logo!”. Something you want to relate to any potential client is the longevity of the relationship. In other words (true intentions or not) you would rather have a long working relationship with a client instead of doing a quick, out-the-door job. This is good in practice, as if you do more work for the same client, it will have a unified look. You should always be excited about meeting them in person, and ask for other collateral and pieces they’ve liked. All this translates into genuine interest and good will, and will show the client that there’s more to logo creation than just a few good shapes and colors. Asking about the company mission statement, as well as input from others is always a good idea, as this often translates into saved time for revisions. I have some brochure/print jobs that I actually restrict a 3-revision limit to. Print design is it’s own animal.

  • http://www.christiancoquet.com Christian

    Great article, im just collecting info for my freelance company and i want to avoid those abusive clients (80% where i live) with contracts and just fares.

  • http://www.christiancoquet.com Christian

    Great article, im just collecting info for my freelance company and i want to avoid those abusive clients (80% where i live) with contracts and just fares.

  • Greg

    Everything in this piece is absolutely dead on. Starting out you will make very little, generally. Talk to non-profits/museums/galleries if you’re breaking in for work, as often they will give you great portfolio experience even if there’s little/no money. Don’t ever use spec work in your portfolio. And absolutely avoid busters… if you ever hear “we’re just starting out, but this will be great experience for you” then RUN. And never, ever participate in “logo contest” work. Google that one. I would also say it depends where you live. I’m in Los Angeles, and won
    ‘t work for under 50/hr. This rate was halved in other places I lived. If you can work for a company not in your area, great. But never lowball yourself. If you really really want to work for a certain client and get that portfolio experience, then you can always highball, but if they’re considering other designers, say “I’m really excited to be working with YOU and I’m willing to negotiate if your budget restricts my bid”. Good luck everyone.

  • Greg

    I thought I would add another thought, as this article refers to logo creation. Hehe yeah, I always here companies say “but it’s just a little logo!”. Something you want to relate to any potential client is the longevity of the relationship. In other words (true intentions or not) you would rather have a long working relationship with a client instead of doing a quick, out-the-door job. This is good in practice, as if you do more work for the same client, it will have a unified look. You should always be excited about meeting them in person, and ask for other collateral and pieces they’ve liked. All this translates into genuine interest and good will, and will show the client that there’s more to logo creation than just a few good shapes and colors. Asking about the company mission statement, as well as input from others is always a good idea, as this often translates into saved time for revisions. I have some brochure/print jobs that I actually restrict a 3-revision limit to. Print design is it’s own animal.

  • Jonathan

    Thanks, starting out these things you talked about is some what a concern.

  • Jonathan

    Thanks, starting out these things you talked about is some what a concern.

  • http://www.gomedia.us Bill

    Thanks to everyone for taking the time to add to this wonderful discussion! I’m sure these comments are a fantastic resource to the young designer just starting out.

    I wanted to add to this conversation a real short story.

    When I was just starting out, my first year, I got stiffed on a HUGE project. Not only was I stiffed, but I was brokering printing back then. I didn’t make the client pay me up-front for the printing. I actually paid for the printing out of my own pocket with the belief that I would be paid back plus a commission.

    Just as I was starting to get really worried the client declared bankruptcy. I got stiffed on my design fees AND all the printing I had paid for – and it was a LOT.

    This came at a moment when I was already broke. I was depending on this work to get me over the hump. I was so upset I decided to quit. Shut down go media and get a “regular” job. But fortunately for me, my mom talked me out of it. She said: “It may seem like you lost a lot now, but in reality this is a cheap lesson. You’re just starting out and this is a good lesson to learn from. In the long run you’ll realize this isn’t as much money as it feels like now.”

    She was 100% correct. In retrospect the amount I lost was small compared to what we earn now. Also – I leaned two VERY valuable lessons: 1. Make clients pay for their printing 100% up-front. And 2. Require deposits.

    That was the most valuable lessons I ever learned. I hope you all have lessons like that too. You’ll be better for them in the long run.

    • http://www.facebook.com/kadeza.begum Kadeza Begum

      I just has that lesson today!! Hence why I googling all sorts of helps on how to deal with it! Your story was really inspirational and the post was a great help too. Alot of it was painfully true to my current situatuation. Getting stiffed hurts-especially when its from a ‘friend’ who you started helping out as a favour. I have just completed a whopping project branding and packaging for a new company. It is also a start up, what royalty fee should I be charging??
      thank you!

    • http://twitter.com/desertrose0601 Jennifer M.

      Our professor told us a similar story that happened to him as a young designer and it definitely made me realize that even a “little” fee for printing needs to be taken seriously. You never know when you’ll be stuck holding the bill. And while I’m certainly not glad that you had to go through this, I am grateful to learn this lesson through you before I make the same mistake! Thank you for sharing. :)

  • http://www.gomedia.us Bill

    Thanks to everyone for taking the time to add to this wonderful discussion! I’m sure these comments are a fantastic resource to the young designer just starting out.

    I wanted to add to this conversation a real short story.

    When I was just starting out, my first year, I got stiffed on a HUGE project. Not only was I stiffed, but I was brokering printing back then. I didn’t make the client pay me up-front for the printing. I actually paid for the printing out of my own pocket with the belief that I would be paid back plus a commission.

    Just as I was starting to get really worried the client declared bankruptcy. I got stiffed on my design fees AND all the printing I had paid for – and it was a LOT.

    This came at a moment when I was already broke. I was depending on this work to get me over the hump. I was so upset I decided to quit. Shut down go media and get a “regular” job. But fortunately for me, my mom talked me out of it. She said: “It may seem like you lost a lot now, but in reality this is a cheap lesson. You’re just starting out and this is a good lesson to learn from. In the long run you’ll realize this isn’t as much money as it feels like now.”

    She was 100% correct. In retrospect the amount I lost was small compared to what we earn now. Also – I leaned two VERY valuable lessons: 1. Make clients pay for their printing 100% up-front. And 2. Require deposits.

    That was the most valuable lessons I ever learned. I hope you all have lessons like that too. You’ll be better for them in the long run.

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  • dirk

    AWESOME ARTICLE!!!! Can we have more like this!!! ;)

  • dirk

    AWESOME ARTICLE!!!! Can we have more like this!!! ;)

  • Derick

    Thanks for the insight everyone. I am getting ready to graduate college and I plan doing some freelancing while searching for a position. This has been a big help.

  • Derick

    Thanks for the insight everyone. I am getting ready to graduate college and I plan doing some freelancing while searching for a position. This has been a big help.

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  • http://www.unocomcr.com Erich Johanning

    Hello everyone. Im from Costa Rica, I run a little Advertising Agency, we open a year ago and reading all this I notice that the busters are everywhere trying to take advantage of small business, everything that Bill posted happened to me during this year but also is true that thanks to does experience now Im wiser and now I know how to identify them. Thanks to Go Media, is good to see that there are people interested in share information and help younger entrepreneur like us. Good Luck.

  • http://www.unocomcr.com Erich Johanning

    Hello everyone. Im from Costa Rica, I run a little Advertising Agency, we open a year ago and reading all this I notice that the busters are everywhere trying to take advantage of small business, everything that Bill posted happened to me during this year but also is true that thanks to does experience now Im wiser and now I know how to identify them. Thanks to Go Media, is good to see that there are people interested in share information and help younger entrepreneur like us. Good Luck.

  • http://benleivian.com Ben Leivian

    Thanks for the article. It’s great have insight on something as subjective as pricing. I knew I wasn’t the only one that experienced a flat-rate billing fiasco. I also added a few new terms to my vocabulary as well.

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/bleivian Ben Leivian

    Thanks for the article. It’s great have insight on something as subjective as pricing. I knew I wasn’t the only one that experienced a flat-rate billing fiasco. I also added a few new terms to my vocabulary as well.

  • http://kingwoodconnection.com Carla

    Great article

    Be wary of clients that are hyper active with energy and try to get you pumped up about their business, but have no up-front money to pay you.

    Where was this three months ago! I totally got pulled into something like this . . . and when they are friends it is worse.

    One thing I would comment on is that even if the client or project is too small to enforce the contract, it still has value. If you have a contract that clearly states what is included, the terms, timeline, and both parties responsibilities, it really helps keep the project to what was agreed upon. So when a client says, “Can we do X, Y, and Z,” you can just say, “Yes, and it will be $XX extra.”

    Regarding Quickbooks, I just wanted to mention an accounting company that focuses exclusively on Quickbooks. You can have Growth Force just do your monthly reconciliation and income statement to full accounts payable and receivable. They also have a service where they will set up Quickbooks for you to best suit your business. They are in my hometown, but they have clients nationwide.

  • http://kingwoodconnection.com Carla

    Great article

    Be wary of clients that are hyper active with energy and try to get you pumped up about their business, but have no up-front money to pay you.

    Where was this three months ago! I totally got pulled into something like this . . . and when they are friends it is worse.

    One thing I would comment on is that even if the client or project is too small to enforce the contract, it still has value. If you have a contract that clearly states what is included, the terms, timeline, and both parties responsibilities, it really helps keep the project to what was agreed upon. So when a client says, “Can we do X, Y, and Z,” you can just say, “Yes, and it will be $XX extra.”

    Regarding Quickbooks, I just wanted to mention an accounting company that focuses exclusively on Quickbooks. You can have Growth Force just do your monthly reconciliation and income statement to full accounts payable and receivable. They also have a service where they will set up Quickbooks for you to best suit your business. They are in my hometown, but they have clients nationwide.

  • Nathan

    I just wanted to say that Ive recently gone freelance and more recently discovered GoMedia. I really appreciate how open you guys are about everything, the advice is invaluable.

    Thanks so much…

  • Nathan

    I just wanted to say that Ive recently gone freelance and more recently discovered GoMedia. I really appreciate how open you guys are about everything, the advice is invaluable.

    Thanks so much…

  • http://www.keithics.com fivel

    Very informative!! thanks!

  • http://www.keithics.com fivel

    Very informative!! thanks!

  • J.

    How to price and how to avoid getting ripped off. Such an important part of the job, yet my college instructors rarely discussed these things with us. Thank you so much for this article.

  • J.

    How to price and how to avoid getting ripped off. Such an important part of the job, yet my college instructors rarely discussed these things with us. Thank you so much for this article.

  • Urwen

    Thanks a lot for a great article!
    You had answerd the hardest questions for me:) I’m thinking about going into freelancing and money-related questions are my biggest fear. Your advise is gratly appreciated!

  • Urwen

    Thanks a lot for a great article!
    You had answerd the hardest questions for me:) I’m thinking about going into freelancing and money-related questions are my biggest fear. Your advise is gratly appreciated!

  • Kunle

    ‘Be wary of clients that are hyper active with energy and try to get you pumped up about their business, but have no up-front money to pay you.’

    I’m holding a bounced check in my hand as I write this. The issuer was totally clueless as to what the project was, but he had a lot of zeal. I ended up doing all the research and gathering all the elements that was required for the project AND I payed for delivering the finished work to another state.

    It won’t happen again.

  • Kunle

    ‘Be wary of clients that are hyper active with energy and try to get you pumped up about their business, but have no up-front money to pay you.’

    I’m holding a bounced check in my hand as I write this. The issuer was totally clueless as to what the project was, but he had a lot of zeal. I ended up doing all the research and gathering all the elements that was required for the project AND I payed for delivering the finished work to another state.

    It won’t happen again.

  • Leal

    Nice Post. This is something I needed to know. Greetings from Belize. Looking forward to more from you guys.

  • Leal

    Nice Post. This is something I needed to know. Greetings from Belize. Looking forward to more from you guys.

  • Herk108

    nice post. this is what i was lookin for from a designer’s viewpoint. thanks.

  • Herk108

    nice post. this is what i was lookin for from a designer’s viewpoint. thanks.

  • http://aiburn.com Sean Hodge

    This is an awesome resource and comprehensive post on the subject. I could say, “I wish I read this a year ago.” But I probably wouldn’t have appreciated this advice until now. Thanks.

  • http://aiburn.com Sean Hodge

    This is an awesome resource and comprehensive post on the subject. I could say, “I wish I read this a year ago.” But I probably wouldn’t have appreciated this advice until now. Thanks.

  • Evan Rogers

    Thank you guys for this. I have been stiffed and will be stiffed no longer from “Busters”

  • Evan Rogers

    Thank you guys for this. I have been stiffed and will be stiffed no longer from “Busters”

  • Christine

    Thanks for the advice guys!..

  • Christine

    Thanks for the advice guys!..

  • http://coghillcartooning.com George Coghill

    Nice to-the-point article. Glad to see someone else not waving contracts around in smaller clients’ faces. Your point about actually collecting the money is where it’s all centered.

    And yeah, NEVER work with people promising to do all sorts of follow-up work and referrals in exchange for super-cheap/free work. In fact, my best clients are those that don’t haggle (or at least not too much) over pricing, and clients that years ago I almost blew off thinking it was too rinky-dink – and they turn out to be the clients who keep coming back for repeat work. Low-key folks tend to also be steady. The ol’ rabbit vs. hare story I guess.

    I am still on flat-rate billing, but for now I prefer it that way. I lay out exactly what I will provide as far as initial conpcepts and revisions to the chosen concept so I don’t get into endless revisions. Keeps things tight and encourages clients to not be wishy-washy with their comments/revision requests.

    I also started upping rates when I was busy, and the interesting thing is that you’ll find are able to charge much more than you might have been comfortable with in the past. I still think my rates are too low, but I need to get over that next hump. For that I think I need to up the level of clients I work with.

    Good stuff, thanks guys!

  • http://coghillcartooning.com George Coghill

    Nice to-the-point article. Glad to see someone else not waving contracts around in smaller clients’ faces. Your point about actually collecting the money is where it’s all centered.

    And yeah, NEVER work with people promising to do all sorts of follow-up work and referrals in exchange for super-cheap/free work. In fact, my best clients are those that don’t haggle (or at least not too much) over pricing, and clients that years ago I almost blew off thinking it was too rinky-dink – and they turn out to be the clients who keep coming back for repeat work. Low-key folks tend to also be steady. The ol’ rabbit vs. hare story I guess.

    I am still on flat-rate billing, but for now I prefer it that way. I lay out exactly what I will provide as far as initial conpcepts and revisions to the chosen concept so I don’t get into endless revisions. Keeps things tight and encourages clients to not be wishy-washy with their comments/revision requests.

    I also started upping rates when I was busy, and the interesting thing is that you’ll find are able to charge much more than you might have been comfortable with in the past. I still think my rates are too low, but I need to get over that next hump. For that I think I need to up the level of clients I work with.

    Good stuff, thanks guys!

  • Pingback: 15 Awful Mistakes Made by Designers in the Music & Apparel Industry - Part 1 of 3 | GoMediaZine

  • http://www.biklopsdesign.com jeff immer

    In case no one mentioned it–a Kill Fee is typically the name given to a fee, specified in your contract, that you will be paid if the project is canceled. That way 2 months into developing Amazon.com 2.0, the client can’t say “I don’t want to do this any more” and then not pay you for your work. A deposit helps in this case, but a kill fee insures you receive a more appropriate amount of money for the services rendered.

  • http://www.biklopsdesign.com jeff immer

    In case no one mentioned it–a Kill Fee is typically the name given to a fee, specified in your contract, that you will be paid if the project is canceled. That way 2 months into developing Amazon.com 2.0, the client can’t say “I don’t want to do this any more” and then not pay you for your work. A deposit helps in this case, but a kill fee insures you receive a more appropriate amount of money for the services rendered.

  • http://www.cicadaonline.com/josh Josh

    Most of what you wrote is very accurate for freelancers and small shops. Though I would never not write a contract for a reasonable job. Contracts basically outline limitations and what you will do for said job. They also look professional and give the client the notice that what you do is serious.

    Perhaps there is no need to do this for a $100 flyer, but basically if you’re doing a 1k+ job you need to have a contract.

    The AIGA provide a good comprehensive resource on how to write a contract and provide a lengthy legal copy that which you can include.

    http://www.aiga.org/content.cfm/standard-agreement

  • http://www.cicadaonline.com/josh Josh

    Most of what you wrote is very accurate for freelancers and small shops. Though I would never not write a contract for a reasonable job. Contracts basically outline limitations and what you will do for said job. They also look professional and give the client the notice that what you do is serious.

    Perhaps there is no need to do this for a $100 flyer, but basically if you’re doing a 1k+ job you need to have a contract.

    The AIGA provide a good comprehensive resource on how to write a contract and provide a lengthy legal copy that which you can include.

    http://www.aiga.org/content.cfm/standard-agreement

  • http://www.burningpulsedesign.com Pj Disharoon

    Great article

  • http://www.burningpulsedesign.com Pj Disharoon

    Great article

  • http://www.easilyamusedinc.com EasilyAmused

    I think all of the points you made where good some better then others. the only point i have a problem with is the no contract under 50K.

    We have a vary in-depth contract and we have never had to fight anyone on money when a contract was in play. The only time we have had issues was when we thought we didn’t need a contract–such as when the price is small, or the client is a friend of a friend.

    We use our contract as a road map. If the client wants to get pushy or they ask for another round of revisions we say, “in the contract…” and allowing us to bill them for our extra time. We set all the overages in our contract.

    The Flat rate thing is good but we have also changed that. Here at Easily Amused, we’ve created a hybrid. The organic design and code is a flat rate and all the extra design, artwork creation and searching for stock photography is billed separately. Our clients get a certain number of revisions and the rest is again, bill separately.

    we love what we do but it is veary hard when you dont know what others are charging. and this aldepens on your skill level and your market.

    If you are in a small town in the Mi-West and there might only something like 50 business, then there is no way you can charge the same rates no–mater how good you are–as a studio in LA or New Yourk.

    Everything will come in time and if you make it through the first 6 months then great, you new goal is to make it another 6 more months and so on and so forth.

    If you’re happy and you’re not working for someone else (or the man) then more power to you. One point of advice, or a closer if you will.

    “LEARN TO LOVE RAMEN NOODLES”

  • http://www.easilyamusedinc.com EasilyAmused

    I think all of the points you made where good some better then others. the only point i have a problem with is the no contract under 50K.

    We have a vary in-depth contract and we have never had to fight anyone on money when a contract was in play. The only time we have had issues was when we thought we didn’t need a contract–such as when the price is small, or the client is a friend of a friend.

    We use our contract as a road map. If the client wants to get pushy or they ask for another round of revisions we say, “in the contract…” and allowing us to bill them for our extra time. We set all the overages in our contract.

    The Flat rate thing is good but we have also changed that. Here at Easily Amused, we’ve created a hybrid. The organic design and code is a flat rate and all the extra design, artwork creation and searching for stock photography is billed separately. Our clients get a certain number of revisions and the rest is again, bill separately.

    we love what we do but it is veary hard when you dont know what others are charging. and this aldepens on your skill level and your market.

    If you are in a small town in the Mi-West and there might only something like 50 business, then there is no way you can charge the same rates no–mater how good you are–as a studio in LA or New Yourk.

    Everything will come in time and if you make it through the first 6 months then great, you new goal is to make it another 6 more months and so on and so forth.

    If you’re happy and you’re not working for someone else (or the man) then more power to you. One point of advice, or a closer if you will.

    “LEARN TO LOVE RAMEN NOODLES”

  • http://www.gomedia.us William A. Beachy

    @EasilyAmused

    I guess I should clartify a few things about Go Media’s practices that relate to the importance of contracts.

    First – many of the items EasilyAmused referenced in his contracts is actually on all of our invoices. And technically, an invoice is a contract (once they’ve paid you on it.) So, things like rate of pay for additions or “out-of-scope” work is covered.

    Also – We require deposits and incremental payments. So, this takes a LOT of the risk out for us. We already have the money when we start working! If you are billing on like 30, 60 or 90 day terms – then a contract will help show the client you’re serious.

    And I do think that everyone needs to take the steps that feel comfortable to them. So, if a contract will make YOU feel better – than get one.

    -Bill

  • http://www.gomedia.us William A. Beachy

    @EasilyAmused

    I guess I should clartify a few things about Go Media’s practices that relate to the importance of contracts.

    First – many of the items EasilyAmused referenced in his contracts is actually on all of our invoices. And technically, an invoice is a contract (once they’ve paid you on it.) So, things like rate of pay for additions or “out-of-scope” work is covered.

    Also – We require deposits and incremental payments. So, this takes a LOT of the risk out for us. We already have the money when we start working! If you are billing on like 30, 60 or 90 day terms – then a contract will help show the client you’re serious.

    And I do think that everyone needs to take the steps that feel comfortable to them. So, if a contract will make YOU feel better – than get one.

    -Bill

  • http://www.JordanPagels.com Jordan

    I just wanted to thank you really quickly for this article, I just stumbled onto your sight tonight and I’ve read some very helpful things for someone just starting out, like myself. So, yeah, thanks so much for all your great insight.

  • http://www.JordanPagels.com Jordan

    I just wanted to thank you really quickly for this article, I just stumbled onto your sight tonight and I’ve read some very helpful things for someone just starting out, like myself. So, yeah, thanks so much for all your great insight.

  • Pingback: 15 Awful Mistakes Made by Designers in the Music and Apparell Industry.Part 1 « Workaholic

  • http://www.alfredfox.com Affordable Web Design

    Pricing is always difficult for a web project. I find one of the best ways to do it is have a base price but be flexible. You know, if you have a customer with a $800 budget, but you have $1000 minimum on projects, then you should go for the $800 – it’s a job and you help someone out. (Of course there are limits to this tactic – lol)

  • http://www.alfredfox.com Affordable Web Design

    Pricing is always difficult for a web project. I find one of the best ways to do it is have a base price but be flexible. You know, if you have a customer with a $800 budget, but you have $1000 minimum on projects, then you should go for the $800 – it’s a job and you help someone out. (Of course there are limits to this tactic – lol)

  • http://www.targetict.com neil

    really good article, yet another aspect of design that people ae unaware of!

  • http://www.targetict.com neil

    really good article, yet another aspect of design that people ae unaware of!

  • Nicolaig

    thanks.
    Great article, its really helped.

  • Nicolaig

    thanks.
    Great article, its really helped.

  • Juan

    You don’t need to do free work to pitch. It is true that large advertising agencies often produce a lot of work for free to win a pitch, but then they make a shed load of money if they win the job, often marking up the price to cover the cost of this and other unsuccessful pitches. This is also becoming more and more outdated as agencies are learning to stand up for themselves in terms of the value of their work.

    A pitch isn’t always about pitching a concept or design, it can also be about pitching a process, a way of working or the benefit that the client will get from working with you. We now no longer do spec work and pitch purely on the effectiveness of our agency and back this up with evidence through case studies. We win far more pitches this way than before and the only cost to our agency is travel costs and the time spent to keep our case studies and portfolio updated with our latest work.

  • Juan

    You don’t need to do free work to pitch. It is true that large advertising agencies often produce a lot of work for free to win a pitch, but then they make a shed load of money if they win the job, often marking up the price to cover the cost of this and other unsuccessful pitches. This is also becoming more and more outdated as agencies are learning to stand up for themselves in terms of the value of their work.

    A pitch isn’t always about pitching a concept or design, it can also be about pitching a process, a way of working or the benefit that the client will get from working with you. We now no longer do spec work and pitch purely on the effectiveness of our agency and back this up with evidence through case studies. We win far more pitches this way than before and the only cost to our agency is travel costs and the time spent to keep our case studies and portfolio updated with our latest work.

  • Pingback: 15 Awful Mistakes Made by Designers in the Music & Apparel Industry - 3 of 3 | GoMediaZine

  • http://www.modati.com Sarms

    When I started my clothing company a few years ago, my partner and I designed, printed, and marketed everything. Since then we’ve worked with a few designers/ friends of ours. We always envisioned expanding our company to a artist collective but most of the designers we sollicted were only interested in getting paid, which we were happy to do. It was a little disheartening though. Reading this post has helped me understand where designers are coming from.

  • http://www.modati.com Sarms

    When I started my clothing company a few years ago, my partner and I designed, printed, and marketed everything. Since then we’ve worked with a few designers/ friends of ours. We always envisioned expanding our company to a artist collective but most of the designers we sollicted were only interested in getting paid, which we were happy to do. It was a little disheartening though. Reading this post has helped me understand where designers are coming from.

  • http://www.thenetguruz.com thenetguruz

    Nice article, it was something I wanted to read about. As a freelancer, I do web design work everyday. Some clients are good and pay what I ask (I am still at the stage of using flat rate) but few bargain, like they show me that they are getting same work done for this much which is really annoying. Some clients will pay for work x then want to get another work y to be done free and even wont pay for work z well. What to do of these clients ?

  • http://www.thenetguruz.com thenetguruz

    Nice article, it was something I wanted to read about. As a freelancer, I do web design work everyday. Some clients are good and pay what I ask (I am still at the stage of using flat rate) but few bargain, like they show me that they are getting same work done for this much which is really annoying. Some clients will pay for work x then want to get another work y to be done free and even wont pay for work z well. What to do of these clients ?

  • http://www.gomedia.us william A. Beachy

    @ TheNetGuruz

    I frequently hear the bargaining tactic of: “I can get the same service at XYZ cheaper – so you need to do it for me for less.”

    All this accomplishes with me is that I get annoyed. Well, I think to myself, if you can get the SAME work cheaper at XYZ design firm – great! Now leave my office, go over to XYZ design firm and hire them! What are you doing here?

    Obviously – they’re in MY office because it’s NOT the same service. This is Go Media!

    The same way you can’t walk into a fancy restaurant and ask for them to reduce their prices because McDonald’s sells food for much less. The quality is not the same.

    Of course, it’s OK to negotiate. And if I’m slow I’ll certainly give price breaks for jobs that I want. But the “someone-does-it-cheaper” argument never held any water with me.

    As far as customers that hire you for one job, then expect that you should do a second job for free – as if you owe them – sounds like a jerk of a customer. You don’t owe them ANYTHING. Each deal needs to be negotiated and agreed upon regardless of previous deals. Each new job a customer gives you needs to be billed at the rate you think is fair.

    Now, if a customer has been giving me tens of thousands of dollars worth of projects for three years straight, and one day he comes to me and says: “Business has been horrible this year. We’re on the brink of bankrupcy – I need 5 more designs to launch this year’s apparel line, can you help me out?”

    Will I give him some free design services? Absolutely. He has shown me that he is not a buster by paying for years. We’ve formed a mutually beneficial relationship; I provide designs, he sells them – and he’s shown that he’s good at it. And now he needs my help to keep the relationship working. It’s in my best interest to keep his company alive. We are now living in a symbiotic relationship. I need him and he needs me.

    That’s why international business is good for world peace! Nobody wants their government to bomb their overseas business partners!

  • http://www.gomedia.us william A. Beachy

    @ TheNetGuruz

    I frequently hear the bargaining tactic of: “I can get the same service at XYZ cheaper – so you need to do it for me for less.”

    All this accomplishes with me is that I get annoyed. Well, I think to myself, if you can get the SAME work cheaper at XYZ design firm – great! Now leave my office, go over to XYZ design firm and hire them! What are you doing here?

    Obviously – they’re in MY office because it’s NOT the same service. This is Go Media!

    The same way you can’t walk into a fancy restaurant and ask for them to reduce their prices because McDonald’s sells food for much less. The quality is not the same.

    Of course, it’s OK to negotiate. And if I’m slow I’ll certainly give price breaks for jobs that I want. But the “someone-does-it-cheaper” argument never held any water with me.

    As far as customers that hire you for one job, then expect that you should do a second job for free – as if you owe them – sounds like a jerk of a customer. You don’t owe them ANYTHING. Each deal needs to be negotiated and agreed upon regardless of previous deals. Each new job a customer gives you needs to be billed at the rate you think is fair.

    Now, if a customer has been giving me tens of thousands of dollars worth of projects for three years straight, and one day he comes to me and says: “Business has been horrible this year. We’re on the brink of bankrupcy – I need 5 more designs to launch this year’s apparel line, can you help me out?”

    Will I give him some free design services? Absolutely. He has shown me that he is not a buster by paying for years. We’ve formed a mutually beneficial relationship; I provide designs, he sells them – and he’s shown that he’s good at it. And now he needs my help to keep the relationship working. It’s in my best interest to keep his company alive. We are now living in a symbiotic relationship. I need him and he needs me.

    That’s why international business is good for world peace! Nobody wants their government to bomb their overseas business partners!

  • Chris

    Man! This was awesome. So many questions answered about things I’ve never had to deal with like contracts. Really help to demystify some of these things as I start my own freelance business. Thank you!!!

  • Chris

    Man! This was awesome. So many questions answered about things I’ve never had to deal with like contracts. Really help to demystify some of these things as I start my own freelance business. Thank you!!!

  • http://derekgores.com/wordpress derek

    What a great thread.
    Just wanted to add- the best antidote to the ‘you should be cheaper than this other guy’ demand- is quality art, and quality customer service. Even if you are just starting out, show and tell your potential client how you are better than the cheaper options.

    Even when I’m responding to a simple email solicitation – “Saw your cover art for such n such, what are your fees?” I always answer with my fees, and then add something like- “I work hard to understand my subject, researching the history, the themes, the appropriate trends so I will deliver the right image. I’m a team player and I’m dependable.”

    Many artists are missing the customer service part.

  • http://derekgores.com/wordpress derek

    What a great thread.
    Just wanted to add- the best antidote to the ‘you should be cheaper than this other guy’ demand- is quality art, and quality customer service. Even if you are just starting out, show and tell your potential client how you are better than the cheaper options.

    Even when I’m responding to a simple email solicitation – “Saw your cover art for such n such, what are your fees?” I always answer with my fees, and then add something like- “I work hard to understand my subject, researching the history, the themes, the appropriate trends so I will deliver the right image. I’m a team player and I’m dependable.”

    Many artists are missing the customer service part.

  • http://www.franciscogalarraga.com Francisco Galárraga

    Yep, I now have one of my best friends that’s feeling that I ripped him off, with my flat fee for designing his companies branding. Even worse, it’s an economical friendly fee. Turns out that he has a cousin that’s advising him that what he’s paying for design seems too much… damn it i hope he plays. I hate to have been put in this situation – i should’ve read this article last year…

  • http://www.franciscogalarraga.com Francisco Galárraga

    Yep, I now have one of my best friends that’s feeling that I ripped him off, with my flat fee for designing his companies branding. Even worse, it’s an economical friendly fee. Turns out that he has a cousin that’s advising him that what he’s paying for design seems too much… damn it i hope he plays. I hate to have been put in this situation – i should’ve read this article last year…

  • http://thtdesign.net Tamara

    Thank you for your insight!

  • http://thtdesign.net Tamara

    Thank you for your insight!

  • Paulo Canabarro

    Great post Bill, thank you for sharing such good content from your experience.

  • Paulo Canabarro

    Great post Bill, thank you for sharing such good content from your experience.

  • Jennifer

    Great article. Note, pitching can also be perceived as spec work, which we as creatives are against. Doing spec work simply undercuts you and your colleagues. Be careful when you walk the pitch line and avoid if at all possible. Real clients will pay you for your time.

  • http://www.junglejar.com Christopher Hennis

    Yeah, nice article and I completely went through the same type stuff. It was refreshing to see someone being a bit personal with their articles, and flat out saying “Yeah, I was making $5/hour.”

    I enjoyed it.

  • Dan

    Excellent job..
    dizi izle

  • oohdoyle

    Awesome article! This will help a lot, can't wait for Part 3.

  • doyle

    Ooops, previous post was wrong. Awesome article nonetheless.

  • http://www.bestcardprinter.com Jeff Jones

    Thanks for the insight. This is a really good base to help decide pricing for designs and taking the deposit is one that we use, and is very effective, Cheers!

  • Jmzolman

    Nice post!!!

  • http://jmzolman.com Jmzolman

    Nice post!!!

  • Vepawn

    Thanks for this! It’s just what I needed and it’s super helpful :D thanks for the time and effort sharing your experiences :)

  • Anonymous

    Great article. This was really helpful. I’ve had such a hard time figuring out pricing structure for my business and this has given me a lot to think about. 

  • Anonymous

    Love it, great article. Some of the crap customers come out with is priceless. My favourite has to be customers that have not settled their previous invoices wanting more work doing. I have now got to the point of not having to take on every job just to put food on the table and so get great satisfaction in not getting messed about by dodgy clients.

  • Megan Maher

    Really great advice and blog! Thank you for taking the time and writing this, really appreciate it! :)

  • http://twitter.com/desertrose0601 Jennifer M.

    This was extremely helpful. I’m a gr.design student and have been trying to wrap my head around how to figure out what to charge clients. For some reason this is not a subject commonly talked about in our design classes. I’ve had trouble even figuring out what ballpark to start charging in. I love what you said, though, about easing into the pricing – starting fairly low and upping it as you start getting too much work. That makes sense and makes the pricing not seem so arbitrary. By the time I’m charging “real designer” prices, I’ll have much more confidence in my work and a strong portfolio to back it up!

  • Julia Molina

    awesome advise, thanks!!!!
    Your words and time are a real time saver for people like me with little experience that has been busted in every way ;)

  • http://www.facebook.com/wendy.waggoner.9 Wendy Waggoner

    This was a lot of help. Thank you so much

  • http://twitter.com/ahhmontea ahhmontea

    Dude, this is an amazing article. I’m in my last year at art school and this helps a lot. I’ve been shoving contracts in peoples faces before doing the work, usually small fish individuales and now I realize I dont need to.

  • Dinesh The designer

    Nice article of all in the internet for designers. very clean and practical thanks !!!!

    • Marissa Mele

      You are so very welcome! :)

  • Terri P Williams

    Excellent information. I was just asked to design a brochure and I used to charge $50 two years ago. Your article will help me decide on my rate for a trifold! Thank you!

  • RJ Smith

    Thank you very much for taking the time and energy to write this article. As a “newbie” in the freelance design world, this was EXACTLY the information I was looking for when I google the subject.

  • Amber Emile

    Very good information! Thank you and lots of success!

  • maru

    Thank you very much this was really helpfull!!!

  • eug

    thank you!

  • Pia Alicia Pilar Mogollon

    Thanks for this very in depth and informative insight. :)

  • URLbar

    Thanks for this post! Very insightful

  • Ardi Kumara

    very good article!

  • CMW

    Very good article. Thank you for sharing!

  • Elle Nolan

    This was a fantastic read. Thanks so much for sharing your experiences. :)

    • Heather Sakai

      Glad you enjoyed it Elle!

  • Jean

    Great article!I have a question: how to create banner margins, where I can find the item in Illustrator? I would appreciate the help!

  • Josh Garner Art

    Very clear and accurate. I wish I read this 6 years ago

  • Manav Misra

    Wow! I feel like I just took advantage of you by reading this article and then not paying for it! it’s that good.