Design insights & tutorials.

Design Piracy – What to do when your designs are stolen

Turquoise Flag-Tip

stolendesign.jpg

It’s happened to the best of us and will inevitably happen to you if it hasn’t already. Your hard work and creativity are ripped off without consent, permission, payment, or even credit. Oftentimes the idiot who assembled a piece of garbage like you see above will take credit for the design entirely. You’ll even see fans of the band compliment the “poster” with remarks like “Wow, you’re really talented, you should make a flyer for me!” Or even “I always knew you could draw!”

The image above was a close recreation of a poster that some band on Myspace made using Go Media’s artwork as their “attention grabber.” Their typography was horrid and it made me want to barf. My first instinct was to be all super pissed off and flame the person who created this trash!

The Small Time Crook

vikings.jpg

But then I sat back and took a deep breath. Was this as big of a deal as I thought? It was some band with less than 1,000 total plays and only a few hundred friends. They weren’t any good and were probably just a group of young kids who are fans of our designs. I didn’t want to sound like a complete asshole when I messaged them so I simply said “Woah, sweet design who made it?” The wrote back and said “A friend of mine created it…” Haha.

So was this kid just lying about it? Or did he have a friend make the poster and the friend stole it without the band even knowing? I wrote back and asked for the guy who created it, and he wrote back and said “Woah, I didn’t know that this was something you created. Sorry about that! I’ll take it down right away.” I didn’t even have to ask them to remove it. He was smart enough to notice my profile and portfolio and saw the original artwork in it. He must have got the hint!

This is typical of most cases of design piracy online. Small time, no-name designers wanting to use a cool piece of art for their own. They always say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery right? I try to keep that in mind when “policing” any stolen art. Other examples are teens on Myspace who use your artwork for their backgrounds or profile images. I’ve seen a design I made years ago for a client on various “Pimp Your Myspace” type sites making the artwork available to non-designers all over. The client I did it for paid me for my time and it’s as much his concern as it is mine. But I don’t bother policing stuff like that because I don’t see any of it as a real threat. It’s mostly just fans using some cool graphics to make themselves stand out amongst their friends. No harm done there.

So what can you do when this happens to your designs? If it really bothers you, you can simply send the person a message if you can and politely ask. Tell them who you are and why it’s important that they remove it. Don’t threaten them in the original email. If you’re cool about it, chances are they will be cool about it too. And if they take it down right away, make sure to thank them nicely. If they refuse, that’s when you can start to threaten them with legal action. That usually does the trick for the small time crooks.

The Wannabe Designer

olivercircles.jpg

Sometimes you’ll have another designer that completely steals your work and puts it in his or her portfolio as if they had created it themselves. This is shady business and at some point, you know that the designer is going to be called out on it. When stealing from an established firm such as Go Media, chances are people will recognize Go Media’s work in someone else’s portfolio and ask us about it. When this happens, I contact the designer right away and ask them what they are doing and why. I ask them to remove it and more often than not they do. No questions asked.

Now, you think to yourself, what is this person trying achieve? If they have to resort to stealing other people’s artwork to make themselves look good and get hired, you have to question the person’s skill level, intelligence, and perceived longevity in the design field. Most likely, the designer is not a threat to anyone and is going to run themselves out of business.

What to do? If this happens to you, make sure you get the culprit to remove the artwork immediately. Email or phone call works best. Be polite, not mean or arrogant. Only apply pressure when they appear to be resisting. Most people will immediately take it down if caught. As far as legal action goes, it’s not worth it to even try. Say they got hired to do a $20,000 website because of some high quality Go Media art in their portfolio… Eventually they’re not going to be able to hold up their end of the bargain and they’ll fail. It’s a waste of your time to take it any further unless they are repeat offenders.

Ripping your designs and selling them as their own

strhess.jpg

This gets a little more serious. Say for example, you have a t-shirt design you made. Some new clothing company decides to copy your image outright and print the design and sell it. Or even they might recreate it themselves, but it’s obvious the images are nearly identical. This is where some legal action might be a good idea, but in most cases, it’s not even worth your time to pursue it. A lawyer will tell you that you’ll spend more money on legal fees than anything you’d make from the poor startup clothing company. At best, you send a Cease and Desist letter in addition to an email or phone call explaining your feelings towards the matter.

If it’s a large scale company that rips your designs (which DOES happen!) you have a case. This happened when Johnny Cupcakes was commissioned to design some shirts for Urban Outfitters. They rejected his designs and then released shirts very similar to what he created. I’m not exactly sure what happened in the end, but you’ll be hard pressed to find a lawyer who doesn’t want to go after a “big fish.”

What do I do?

If this happens to you, you probably have a legal case and it could be worth your time to pursue it.

Blatant Ripping and Profiting

set7.jpg

In the case of our vector packs, we are frequently notified by our own customers when they see someone on the net illegally sharing or distributing our products. This is a little different than someone ripping off our design. This is very similar to downloading software or movies. It’s a digital file that we are selling to customers. That income becomes revenue that we use to pay our employees and grow our company. When people are stealing and sharing and in some cases even selling, it directly hurts our sales. We DO see a dip in sales when stuff like this happens. But when you try to contact the website, and it’s in Russian or Hebrew, it’s tough to get a response out of it. You have to kind of assume people will be pirating your digital files if there is any sort of value to them.

What do you do?

Most cases, you can simply report abuse or contact the site owner and politely ask for them to remove the link. That usually works. If not, be persistent. I have a friend who runs a Type Foundry and their fonts are always being pirated. He has since started an anti-piracy coalition online and gathered a team of creatives to help him fight it. I’m not sure if it’s working, but it’s a good start!

Conclusion

If you’re good, you will get your designs ripped. That’s a fact. People want to be like you, but don’t have enough respect for you or themselves to ask permission. One of our designers here Oliver, keeps seeing his “circle series” being freely available as cell phone wallpaper, band’s album artwork, etc. Sometimes it’s flattering, but most of the time it’s insulting.

There isn’t a whole lot you can do unless the culprit is worth a damn. If the company is broke, a lawyer isn’t going to care enough about it to help you. However, most small time offenders can be back on your side with a simple email or phone call. This entire post doesn’t need to be this long, because from my experience that’s all that can be done.

Final Tips to Prevent Design Piracy:

1.) Watermark your images with your logo or name
2.) Add a copyright tag on every image you post on the web
3.) Disable Right Clicking on your Image
4.) Other alternatives

About the Author, Jeff Finley

I'm a partner at Go Media, a Cleveland web design and development firm. We also specialize in print design and branding. I started Weapons of Mass Creation Fest and wrote the book Thread's Not Dead, teaching artists and designers how to start a clothing company. In my spare time, I write songs and play drums in Campfire Conspiracy. I'm a happy husband and an aspiring b-boy and lucid dreamer.
Discover More by Jeff Finley

Discussion

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  • Brian

    That does make my stomach turn… Not only did they steal something but it looks brutal.

  • Bob-O

    Hey Jeff!
    Thanks for this post. I’m just starting out in this business, and all the information I’ve found on copyrights/trademark issues are so full of “leagalese” that it makes it confusing. I really appreciate the “real world” perspective. Any plans for more posts like this?

  • Bob-O

    Hey Jeff!
    Thanks for this post. I’m just starting out in this business, and all the information I’ve found on copyrights/trademark issues are so full of “leagalese” that it makes it confusing. I really appreciate the “real world” perspective. Any plans for more posts like this?

  • http://jack22.deviantart.com Amanda

    Metadata is also a good friend to artists on the web.

  • http://jack22.deviantart.com Amanda

    Metadata is also a good friend to artists on the web.

  • http://www.gomedia.us Jeff

    Bob-O – yeah more posts like this are definitely doable. What kind of stuff do you want to know?

  • http://www.gomedia.us Jeff

    Bob-O – yeah more posts like this are definitely doable. What kind of stuff do you want to know?

  • Brian

    That does make my stomach turn… Not only did they steal something but it looks brutal.

  • travis

    jeff

    when go media occasionally releases a freebie vector (or the more recent watercolor textures), what is the copyright for those? can we use those for commercial designs?

  • travis

    jeff

    when go media occasionally releases a freebie vector (or the more recent watercolor textures), what is the copyright for those? can we use those for commercial designs?

  • Felix

    I call these people “Xeroxes” cause all they do is copy. The only way an artist stands out is by developing his/her own style.

  • http://myspace.com/subconsciouspeace Shawn

    This post is the shit. How many times do so called artists rip off other designers ideas and get away with it…I admit I was inspired by you’re Atticus design when I did the angel design with similar concept. But when anyone ever asks for design tips or inspiration, Gomedia is the first place I send em. Peace

  • http://myspace.com/subconsciouspeace Shawn

    This post is the shit. How many times do so called artists rip off other designers ideas and get away with it…I admit I was inspired by you’re Atticus design when I did the angel design with similar concept. But when anyone ever asks for design tips or inspiration, Gomedia is the first place I send em. Peace

  • http://www.haleysaner.com Haley

    It can happen at any level.. here is the new sony campaign under question..

    http://motionographer.com/2007/10/11/sony-vs-kozyndan-update/

  • http://www.haleysaner.com Haley

    It can happen at any level.. here is the new sony campaign under question..

    http://motionographer.com/2007/10/11/sony-vs-kozyndan-update/

  • http://axecore.com xlukex

    Thanks so much for helping me out with my question , this is a great help :) i love you guys

  • http://axecore.com xlukex

    Thanks so much for helping me out with my question , this is a great help :) i love you guys

  • Felix

    I call these people “Xeroxes” cause all they do is copy. The only way an artist stands out is by developing his/her own style.

  • richb

    Yeah the t-shirt design field is running rampant with complete rip-offs and copy cat designs. I’ve gone back to wearing plain black and white t-shirts.lol.

    By the way you Vector packs are awesome!

  • richb

    Yeah the t-shirt design field is running rampant with complete rip-offs and copy cat designs. I’ve gone back to wearing plain black and white t-shirts.lol.

    By the way you Vector packs are awesome!

  • http://www.gomedia.us Jeff

    travis,

    The free vectors can be used on commercial works. They just cannot be sold as the vector art themselves or a high res image. But you can design a shirt and sell the shirt if you wanted.

  • http://www.gomedia.us Jeff

    travis,

    The free vectors can be used on commercial works. They just cannot be sold as the vector art themselves or a high res image. But you can design a shirt and sell the shirt if you wanted.

  • Jan

    1.) Looks crappy
    2.) copyright signs don’t have any value in the EU. The author has automatically all rights.
    3.) Even or especially stupid rippers can use the ‘Print’ Key and copy the image into photoshop

  • Jan

    1.) Looks crappy
    2.) copyright signs don’t have any value in the EU. The author has automatically all rights.
    3.) Even or especially stupid rippers can use the ‘Print’ Key and copy the image into photoshop

  • Andrew

    that just made me spit out the water I wasa drinking and it hit the screen lol but that was just awful like no skill at all.

  • Andrew

    that just made me spit out the water I wasa drinking and it hit the screen lol but that was just awful like no skill at all.

  • http://www.sosnewbie.com Sergio Ordoñez

    Just a note: if a website rip your artwork just contact his hosting company and explain the issue.

    I personally dont care about small rippers, they are too and me just one person, I would spend all the week sending emails… Im afraid there is nothing you can do to get your artwork safe.

    Im agree… the price of fame :(

  • http://www.sosnewbie.com Sergio Ordoñez

    Just a note: if a website rip your artwork just contact his hosting company and explain the issue.

    I personally dont care about small rippers, they are too and me just one person, I would spend all the week sending emails… Im afraid there is nothing you can do to get your artwork safe.

    Im agree… the price of fame :(

  • toby

    It’s a real shame 2Advanced.com took the Rip Report off their blog. It was almost bizarre seeing what some people thought they could get away with! People decompiling their whole Flash websites and selling them on to clients as original designs!
    The sad fact is, anything digital is subject to theft now. Music, films, art, software, even vectors!

  • toby

    It’s a real shame 2Advanced.com took the Rip Report off their blog. It was almost bizarre seeing what some people thought they could get away with! People decompiling their whole Flash websites and selling them on to clients as original designs!
    The sad fact is, anything digital is subject to theft now. Music, films, art, software, even vectors!

  • MIcah

    Your article was very informative. The only thing I really want to comment on is your section about digital piracy. Now, I’m not admitting to partaking in the activity myself, I just heard a discussion with one of my design professors on the subject and wanted to pass it on. I’m sure it’s something that’s talked about all over and isn’t new to you, but just food for thought:

    In the case of digital piracy in regards to software, it’s hardpressed to really see a dip in sales. You might directly see one, because you’re smaller than say, Adobe. However, Adobe isn’t going to notice much when their software is pirated; they are still the industry leader, and for this reason they’re getting pirated the most. But here’s what it does: Students, who cannot afford the 800+ design suite, are able to get a copy of the program and learn it’s ins and outs. Once they hit the market, their skills list “Adobe Design Suite” and employers are obligated to purchase the software to keep up with the knowledge of their creative.

    I think the same can be said for your stuff, on some level. Think about it this way, maybe (and same can be said for Type Foundries, possibly). If some “kid” pirates your stuff and uses it for some crappy design for their crappy friend’s band (notice it’s not a crappy band, but a crappy friend), then they are obviously noticing you. And most likely, they can’t afford your Design Packs because all of their money is going to playing “Hey Mr” outside the liquor store. But maybe once they graduate from middle school, maybe even high school (if they’re a real achiever), they’ll come back and buy your brand new design packs.

    I mean, we can only hope.

  • MIcah

    Your article was very informative. The only thing I really want to comment on is your section about digital piracy. Now, I’m not admitting to partaking in the activity myself, I just heard a discussion with one of my design professors on the subject and wanted to pass it on. I’m sure it’s something that’s talked about all over and isn’t new to you, but just food for thought:

    In the case of digital piracy in regards to software, it’s hardpressed to really see a dip in sales. You might directly see one, because you’re smaller than say, Adobe. However, Adobe isn’t going to notice much when their software is pirated; they are still the industry leader, and for this reason they’re getting pirated the most. But here’s what it does: Students, who cannot afford the 800+ design suite, are able to get a copy of the program and learn it’s ins and outs. Once they hit the market, their skills list “Adobe Design Suite” and employers are obligated to purchase the software to keep up with the knowledge of their creative.

    I think the same can be said for your stuff, on some level. Think about it this way, maybe (and same can be said for Type Foundries, possibly). If some “kid” pirates your stuff and uses it for some crappy design for their crappy friend’s band (notice it’s not a crappy band, but a crappy friend), then they are obviously noticing you. And most likely, they can’t afford your Design Packs because all of their money is going to playing “Hey Mr” outside the liquor store. But maybe once they graduate from middle school, maybe even high school (if they’re a real achiever), they’ll come back and buy your brand new design packs.

    I mean, we can only hope.

  • FlorentG

    “3.) Disable Right Clicking on your Image”

    Oh noes. Please never advise this, as it is totally useless and possibly harmful.

    Lots of users have special features in their right-click menus (usually because of Firefox extensions).

    And more important, you’ll still be able to steal the picture :
    * drag & drop the image to the desktop
    * printscreen key
    * focus the image and hit the strange-never-used key between Alt Gr and Ctrl
    * View HTML source and grab the image url
    * Sniff HTTP traffic and grab the image url as well

    Just like you said, if you’re good, you will get your images copied. That’s a fact ;)

  • FlorentG

    “3.) Disable Right Clicking on your Image”

    Oh noes. Please never advise this, as it is totally useless and possibly harmful.

    Lots of users have special features in their right-click menus (usually because of Firefox extensions).

    And more important, you’ll still be able to steal the picture :
    * drag & drop the image to the desktop
    * printscreen key
    * focus the image and hit the strange-never-used key between Alt Gr and Ctrl
    * View HTML source and grab the image url
    * Sniff HTTP traffic and grab the image url as well

    Just like you said, if you’re good, you will get your images copied. That’s a fact ;)

  • http://www.gomedia.us Jeff

    Mirah – You bring up some good points. I agree with you there.

    Florent – All those options I listed to help prevent piracy of your images are all worthless solutions to the saavy internet user. If a designer really wants them, they’ll get them no matter what you do. But you can prevent the non-saavy people from getting your images. But I agree with you.

  • http://www.gomedia.us Jeff

    Mirah – You bring up some good points. I agree with you there.

    Florent – All those options I listed to help prevent piracy of your images are all worthless solutions to the saavy internet user. If a designer really wants them, they’ll get them no matter what you do. But you can prevent the non-saavy people from getting your images. But I agree with you.

  • http://dltbgyd.deviantart.com Scott

    I read your article and agree, but then I took a look at your portfolio. One of your Pitch shirt designs has the Rolling Stones logo created by Andy Warhol. ???

  • http://dltbgyd.deviantart.com Scott

    I read your article and agree, but then I took a look at your portfolio. One of your Pitch shirt designs has the Rolling Stones logo created by Andy Warhol. ???

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  • [ beast ]

    Awesome article, Jeff – very lucid and intelligent responses from the members as well. BTW, check out my latest t-shirt design that my smokin’ hot lady modeled for me. peace ;)

    http://www.indiemerchstore.com/images/items/e/4/e4d0a41653.jpg

    yeah, that’s the ticket..

  • [ beast ]

    Awesome article, Jeff – very lucid and intelligent responses from the members as well. BTW, check out my latest t-shirt design that my smokin’ hot lady modeled for me. peace ;)

    http://www.indiemerchstore.com/images/items/e/4/e4d0a41653.jpg

    yeah, that’s the ticket..

  • http://www.gomedia.us Oliver

    Scott, the use of that logo doesn’t mean that we were ripping the Stones off. The design is really a spoof on the logo, and there are plenty of works in the art world that use other published works. For example, Marchel Duchamp’s Mona Lisa or even Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup Cans.

    Also, we’re not ripping off Warhol because he didn’t make that logo. John Pasche did.

  • http://www.gomedia.us Oliver

    Scott, the use of that logo doesn’t mean that we were ripping the Stones off. The design is really a spoof on the logo, and there are plenty of works in the art world that use other published works. For example, Marchel Duchamp’s Mona Lisa or even Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup Cans.

    Also, we’re not ripping off Warhol because he didn’t make that logo. John Pasche did.

  • Robin

    I read the whole thing:). Maybe you don’t remember, but we mailed about this subject a while ago. So its very cool to see some stuff about it here on Go Media.

    I believe that not only “kids” go around the web and steal. I believe the internet is a dangerous tool in general for these things. Btw, you talk about small fish that use other peoples ideas, if you see windows vista, and OSX :) well… no words needed :).

    But concerning the graphics industry, i truly believe the problem is pirate software, people being able to download creative suite almost as a freeware is dangerous. The software and tutorials are so easy to find that everyone wants a try. I also believe if adobe would really disable all the illegal users, 60% of the creative suite users will be disabled. Creating a positive result for all the people who work in this business, beter and more professional work

  • / Robin

    I read the whole thing:). Maybe you don’t remember, but we mailed about this subject a while ago. So its very cool to see some stuff about it here on Go Media.

    I believe that not only “kids” go around the web and steal. I believe the internet is a dangerous tool in general for these things. Btw, you talk about small fish that use other peoples ideas, if you see windows vista, and OSX :) well… no words needed :).

    But concerning the graphics industry, i truly believe the problem is pirate software, people being able to download creative suite almost as a freeware is dangerous. The software and tutorials are so easy to find that everyone wants a try. I also believe if adobe would really disable all the illegal users, 60% of the creative suite users will be disabled. Creating a positive result for all the people who work in this business, beter and more professional work

  • http://benleivian.com Ben Leivian

    Default bevel and glow settings will be the end of design as we know it.

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/bleivian Ben Leivian

    Default bevel and glow settings will be the end of design as we know it.

  • Derek

    Great article. What is your opinion of people just starting out and having emulated work in their portfolio/reel? In mograph, for example, I find it hard to show I can do a specific “popular” effect, or design, without emulating existing work. Are the rules different for a personal portfolio for someone just starting out?

  • Derek

    Great article. What is your opinion of people just starting out and having emulated work in their portfolio/reel? In mograph, for example, I find it hard to show I can do a specific “popular” effect, or design, without emulating existing work. Are the rules different for a personal portfolio for someone just starting out?

  • Sachin

    In the same way, quite a lot of websites also get ripped. Here’s Greg Storey’s shout out to pirates:
    http://www.airbagindustries.com/archives/airbag/superbad.php

  • Sachin

    In the same way, quite a lot of websites also get ripped. Here’s Greg Storey’s shout out to pirates:
    http://www.airbagindustries.com/archives/airbag/superbad.php

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  • Rob

    “Scott, the use of that logo doesn’t mean that we were ripping the Stones off. The design is really a spoof on the logo, and there are plenty of works in the art world that use other published works.”

    What a weak argument. You stole it and don’t value other people’s work.

    Another copyright problem to consider:

    What if the deranged people from Somethingawful.com, Fark.com and B3ta.com use an illustrator’s or designer’s work for satire? This suddenly becomes legal? These sites constantly steal stuff that amateurs (= this does not mean they are untalented) create in their free time and who don’t have the money for legal actions.

    And what if the person who stole my work is from another country?

  • Rob

    “Scott, the use of that logo doesn’t mean that we were ripping the Stones off. The design is really a spoof on the logo, and there are plenty of works in the art world that use other published works.”

    What a weak argument. You stole it and don’t value other people’s work.

    Another copyright problem to consider:

    What if the deranged people from Somethingawful.com, Fark.com and B3ta.com use an illustrator’s or designer’s work for satire? This suddenly becomes legal? These sites constantly steal stuff that amateurs (= this does not mean they are untalented) create in their free time and who don’t have the money for legal actions.

    And what if the person who stole my work is from another country?

  • angie

    I disagree with the disabling of the right click function. I hate it when people use javascript to break MY browser. Beside being completely useless against image theft(as detailed by previous posters) it also gives the impression to your vistors that you assume they are all theives. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to potential clients.

    You also failed to mention the number one thing you can do to detour image appropiation. Make the image a low enough resolution(Or creatively crop it) so that it’s useless to steal.

    As mentioned about anything that’s digital is at risk for theft. It’s our jobs as the creators of that content to make act as difficult as possible without pissing off our desired audience.

  • angie

    I disagree with the disabling of the right click function. I hate it when people use javascript to break MY browser. Beside being completely useless against image theft(as detailed by previous posters) it also gives the impression to your vistors that you assume they are all theives. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to potential clients.

    You also failed to mention the number one thing you can do to detour image appropiation. Make the image a low enough resolution(Or creatively crop it) so that it’s useless to steal.

    As mentioned about anything that’s digital is at risk for theft. It’s our jobs as the creators of that content to make act as difficult as possible without pissing off our desired audience.

  • Tenche

    It’s better to be a pirate, then join the navy.
    - Steve Jobs

    Right click functions are too easy to get around. Don’t use them…

  • Tenche

    It’s better to be a pirate, then join the navy.
    - Steve Jobs

    Right click functions are too easy to get around. Don’t use them…

  • http://coghillcartooning.com George Coghill

    Another nice direct, no-nonsense article.

    I have seen my illustrations appropriated around the web, even some illustrator friends have seen my stuff. I’ve done my best to ask for cease & desist, but the reality is that any legal fees will far outweight what you might stand to get.

    I hate watermarking my stuff, but I feel I have no other option. And even that can be worked around.

  • http://coghillcartooning.com George Coghill

    Another nice direct, no-nonsense article.

    I have seen my illustrations appropriated around the web, even some illustrator friends have seen my stuff. I’ve done my best to ask for cease & desist, but the reality is that any legal fees will far outweight what you might stand to get.

    I hate watermarking my stuff, but I feel I have no other option. And even that can be worked around.

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  • jackie

    Some sites like flickr also offer to place a filter over the image so that can’t right click or drag the image off. It makes the image inviable in a sense.

    What a great post!

  • jackie

    Some sites like flickr also offer to place a filter over the image so that can’t right click or drag the image off. It makes the image inviable in a sense.

    What a great post!

  • http://www.donigerlawfirm.com AttorneyScott

    Interesting article. Our firm specializes in representing artists that have been ripped off by less-than-ethical companies, and we see this sort of thing happening more and more as the internet makes images and designs easier to access. I would add one important note to the piece: If you are going to be circulating your work to the public, you should first file a copyright registration with the U.S.P.T.O. Doing so is not expensive, and provides a number of benefits, such as the ability to recover your attorneys’ fees. If anyone has any questions on this topic, they can contact me at scott@donigerlawfirm.com

    [Note that this posting does not constitute legal advice or create any attorney/client relationship]

  • http://www.donigerlawfirm.com AttorneyScott

    Interesting article. Our firm specializes in representing artists that have been ripped off by less-than-ethical companies, and we see this sort of thing happening more and more as the internet makes images and designs easier to access. I would add one important note to the piece: If you are going to be circulating your work to the public, you should first file a copyright registration with the U.S.P.T.O. Doing so is not expensive, and provides a number of benefits, such as the ability to recover your attorneys’ fees. If anyone has any questions on this topic, they can contact me at scott@donigerlawfirm.com

    [Note that this posting does not constitute legal advice or create any attorney/client relationship]

  • http://thewholehalf.blogspot.com/ tara

    yeah this has happened before…i designed graphics for a design conference and then later saw a very similar graphic on a tshirt, unfortunately for a big company…so yeah…i havn’t done anything about it though

  • http://thewholehalf.blogspot.com/ tara

    yeah this has happened before…i designed graphics for a design conference and then later saw a very similar graphic on a tshirt, unfortunately for a big company…so yeah…i havn’t done anything about it though

  • Dan

    Excellent job..
    dizi izle

  • Anonymous

    Very informative piece!!! I believe one of my design creations has been ripped off by some Italian chick!!! I’m mad as hell but after reading your post I’ve come to a few conclusions. I will definitely take your advice. Thanks

  • Alix ‘Specs’ Mumba

    Very insightful info for aspiring professionals of this industry like myself