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Git Yer Structure Outta Mah Creative!

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I had this art history professor my first year of college who gave the most fantastical lectures; he proudly wore mismatched socks with worn-out Birkenstock sandals. During his lessons, (which were sometimes accompanied by a recording of a Mongolian throat-singing song) his long, wild hair would whip around dramatically and unavoidably hit some poor front-rower in the face. He never talked below a roar, and even the most baked-out students paid attention in his class. For me it was the first few sessions (which I eventually dubbed “theatrical productions”), that were most memorable; this was when he defined the terms “Chthonian” and “Apollonian” which forever divided my perspective.

Chthonian (Ka-thow-nee-yin) qualities in art , my professor explained, can be recognized as dark, lurking, natural, flowing, passionate, and unclear. Apollonian (App-o-low-nee-yin), in contrast, can be seen as light, present, man-made, ordered, impassive, and lucid.  Although my understanding of these two terms are tragically watered-down, my professor was essentially examining the classic dichotomy of nature versus man, of chaos versus order, of the illogical versus the logical.

Years later, I’m still plagued with an awareness of all that is creative and all that is just plain boring. I can’t look at an object, person or website without labeling it as one thing or the other. Maybe it’s just my lunch talking, but I’m sick of  noticing such extreme separations. I’m especially weary of those who sever structure and order completely from the ominous creative process, as if beautiful designs floated down from the heavens with trumpets blowing and rays of light blinding any who dare look. Yes, wonderful moments can certainly happen by accident, but structure and creativity rely on each other much more than we care to admit. This happens naturally, gleefully, like a dog rolling around in a big, steaming pile of poo.

Let me reveal a surprisingly obvious example of when structure and creativity harmonize: If you’re fortunate enough to be in a work environment that keeps a project manager, go up and give them an uncomfortable bear hug right now. These lovely individuals communicate with clients, estimate quotes, create and assign tasks, organize and plan projects, file documents, manage calendars, and much more. On their best days, project managers intuit your needs and tell you politely that the reason you’re cold might be because the window right next to you is open (thanks again, Heather).

It is, in part, because of the creative potential of any work environment that the project manager role exists. Conversely, the project manager’s orchestration of structure and order can keep a designer, in particular, from worrying about all the annoying, extraneous shit that they would rather forget. These two roles have a symbiotic relationship, they need each other.

This is only one example, which is actually a bit counterproductive to my point. Treating one job as “creative” (Chthonian), and another as “structure” (Apollonian) is completely unfair; we know that order and chaos come with any job, filling up any life.  What I’m ultimately getting at is this: there is no canyon between what is logical and illogical; they live side by side, even one on top of the other (hold all dirty jokes, please).

I digress now to ask: what’s your take? Does structure and order play a large role in helping you create? Does creativity play a large role in establishing structure and order?

Discussion

We want to hear what you have to say. Do you agree? Do you have a better way to approach the topic? Let the community know by joining the discussion.

  • http://www.gomedia.us Adam Wagner

    Great post Liz. You’ve posed a pretty big question here.
    For what it’s worth, here is my take:

    You wrote: “the terms “Chthonian” and “Apollonian” … forever divided my perspective.”

    This division is deeply embedded in modern thought. Beautiful / Pragmatic, Rational / Irrational, Romantic / Classical, etc. Many believe this division is most clearly traced back to Aristotle. He had trouble dealing with the sweeping generalities of his teachers. So, he spent most of his career making tables & lists trying to categorize ever..y..thing. Chthonian & Apollonian are elder memebers of this hierarchy.

    I don’t like it. The division is clumsy and lacks economy. Theories(including philosophical ones) lose credence as qualifications are added. The best theories explain a great deal with a very simple premise. Some of the worst have a bible full of qualifications and circumstances that must be met before the theory can be applied.

    So lately I’ve been trying to see just how transparent the Chthonian & Apollonian dichotomy really is. When examined closely, I’d like to make an as-yet unfounded claim that the Beautiful IS Pragmatic. See through this dichotomy. The relationship between the two is more than sybmiotic, it’s one and the same.

    The force that drives a person towards creating a beautiful work of art and solving a non-linear mathematical problem is the same. The end goal of each endeavor is the same: harmony (or any other buzz word that symbolizes that elusive “goodness”).

    Phew. And you thought your post was rambling? :-) Your point is still well taken. In everyday office/business/producitivy life, it makes sense to be aware & discuss these differences because they really are part of our society. But when pondering the true nature of our minds… well… you know.

  • http://www.gomedia.us Adam Wagner

    Great post Liz. You’ve posed a pretty big question here.
    For what it’s worth, here is my take:

    You wrote: “the terms “Chthonian” and “Apollonian” … forever divided my perspective.”

    This division is deeply embedded in modern thought. Beautiful / Pragmatic, Rational / Irrational, Romantic / Classical, etc. Many believe this division is most clearly traced back to Aristotle. He had trouble dealing with the sweeping generalities of his teachers. So, he spent most of his career making tables & lists trying to categorize ever..y..thing. Chthonian & Apollonian are elder memebers of this hierarchy.

    I don’t like it. The division is clumsy and lacks economy. Theories(including philosophical ones) lose credence as qualifications are added. The best theories explain a great deal with a very simple premise. Some of the worst have a bible full of qualifications and circumstances that must be met before the theory can be applied.

    So lately I’ve been trying to see just how transparent the Chthonian & Apollonian dichotomy really is. When examined closely, I’d like to make an as-yet unfounded claim that the Beautiful IS Pragmatic. See through this dichotomy. The relationship between the two is more than sybmiotic, it’s one and the same.

    The force that drives a person towards creating a beautiful work of art and solving a non-linear mathematical problem is the same. The end goal of each endeavor is the same: harmony (or any other buzz word that symbolizes that elusive “goodness”).

    Phew. And you thought your post was rambling? :-) Your point is still well taken. In everyday office/business/producitivy life, it makes sense to be aware & discuss these differences because they really are part of our society. But when pondering the true nature of our minds… well… you know.

  • climb_trees

    A quick jotted down list of “to dos” definitely help set my mind to ease. I’m able to let my anxiety go of what I might be possibly ignoring or forgetting and just focus on creativity. Lists & being creative save my life.

  • climb_trees

    A quick jotted down list of “to dos” definitely help set my mind to ease. I’m able to let my anxiety go of what I might be possibly ignoring or forgetting and just focus on creativity. Lists & being creative save my life.

  • creat3tertiary

    The links to different takes on the creative process were helpful AKA Teresa and Mattias. Thanks,

  • http://www.gomedia.us Oliver

    good post liz, even if you did use creative as a noun in the title. wink wink, nudge nudge.

  • http://www.gomedia.us Oliver

    good post liz, even if you did use creative as a noun in the title. wink wink, nudge nudge.

  • http://www.gomedia.us Liz

    I did it just to piss you off, Oliver :)

  • creat3tertiary

    The links to different takes on the creative process were helpful AKA Teresa and Mattias. Thanks,

  • Ash

    Good article and food for thought, not sure I agree about the PM being the definition of structure and the creative being the opposite and therefore chaos? I think any designer has a process of sorts and therefore structure, even if they do nothing but create they therefore understand the boundaries of who does what and are not some sort of human tornado. Ok, they get to play with ideas a bit more, but this iterative process is again a form or process, structure. I suspect one day we may realise we all have a lot in common when it comes to how we go about design – collecting our creative knowledge, distilling it and experimenting until we fulfill the brief and achieve its goals – we are less artists and more visual scientists.

    So yes, we create and they plan but they are indeed creative in their planning – finding ways to get everything in on time / on cost and to brief thus keeping everyone happy and them in a job, we also plan in our creations – thinking ahead whilst in Photoshop, deciding whether that design will work on the web for example, if it fits the client’s style guide and brief.

    I think it’s fair to say sometimes when given this freedom to create and nothing else, we can get so caught up in it that we can be less focussed on the real world issues at play, by the same token PMs can get to caught up in the deadlines they want to sacrifice creativity. Basically it’s probably something like PMs – 25% creativity 75% planning and designers are the other way round. Of course freelancers for example have to often combine both roles into one person, deal with the client themselves, hit deadlines and get creative – but they seem to manage, it’s just slower. Like anything else, it’s all about finding the right balance of these skills depending on the role you’re in.

  • Ash

    Good article and food for thought, not sure I agree about the PM being the definition of structure and the creative being the opposite and therefore chaos? I think any designer has a process of sorts and therefore structure, even if they do nothing but create they therefore understand the boundaries of who does what and are not some sort of human tornado. Ok, they get to play with ideas a bit more, but this iterative process is again a form or process, structure. I suspect one day we may realise we all have a lot in common when it comes to how we go about design – collecting our creative knowledge, distilling it and experimenting until we fulfill the brief and achieve its goals – we are less artists and more visual scientists.

    So yes, we create and they plan but they are indeed creative in their planning – finding ways to get everything in on time / on cost and to brief thus keeping everyone happy and them in a job, we also plan in our creations – thinking ahead whilst in Photoshop, deciding whether that design will work on the web for example, if it fits the client’s style guide and brief.

    I think it’s fair to say sometimes when given this freedom to create and nothing else, we can get so caught up in it that we can be less focussed on the real world issues at play, by the same token PMs can get to caught up in the deadlines they want to sacrifice creativity. Basically it’s probably something like PMs – 25% creativity 75% planning and designers are the other way round. Of course freelancers for example have to often combine both roles into one person, deal with the client themselves, hit deadlines and get creative – but they seem to manage, it’s just slower. Like anything else, it’s all about finding the right balance of these skills depending on the role you’re in.

  • http://www.thisisaaronslife.com Aaron Irizarry

    Great article!

    I work in a fast paced corporate environment, and more times than not planning isn’t a strength for the products, and projects. So I often have to institute my own structure to help the creative process. Each situation does differ, but I find that the times when I have my ducks in a row and am relatively organized my mind isn’t as cluttered with the chaos that is my job, I can think a bit more freely, and the creative process flows a bit better.

    When I work for myself (freelance, or just trying to have some fun ) I am a bit more lenient with my structure, and kinda roll with the punches(if project allows).

    As with most areas in design/creativity I think it is really dependent on each situation, and the ability to balance structure/creative.

    that’s my two cents

    ~Aaron I

  • http://www.thisisaaronslife.com Aaron Irizarry

    Great article!

    I work in a fast paced corporate environment, and more times than not planning isn’t a strength for the products, and projects. So I often have to institute my own structure to help the creative process. Each situation does differ, but I find that the times when I have my ducks in a row and am relatively organized my mind isn’t as cluttered with the chaos that is my job, I can think a bit more freely, and the creative process flows a bit better.

    When I work for myself (freelance, or just trying to have some fun ) I am a bit more lenient with my structure, and kinda roll with the punches(if project allows).

    As with most areas in design/creativity I think it is really dependent on each situation, and the ability to balance structure/creative.

    that’s my two cents

    ~Aaron I

  • http://www.geoffmay.com Geoff May

    I’m a HUGE advocate of a project manager. As a designer, it’s very liberating to have a buffer between the client and myself.

    As creative as I am (well, at least I think I am) I definitely need a ton of structure, from structured hours of working to a strict billing system. Having everything else organized helps me be more creative because I’m not stressing out about little, non-design related, things. I’m rambling. Go Browns.

  • http://www.geoffmay.com Geoff May

    I’m a HUGE advocate of a project manager. As a designer, it’s very liberating to have a buffer between the client and myself.

    As creative as I am (well, at least I think I am) I definitely need a ton of structure, from structured hours of working to a strict billing system. Having everything else organized helps me be more creative because I’m not stressing out about little, non-design related, things. I’m rambling. Go Browns.

  • http://www.rustyeight.com RustyEight

    Yay long winded response, here we go:

    I am a freelancer. Sure I have a 9-5 too keep a steady check in but that has nothing to do with my point.

    Being a freelancer forces you take up both a Chthonian and Apollonian viewpoint simultaneously. Even if you don’t freelance, we have all had those jobs where you had to be the embodiment structure… maybe you were an assistant manager for a toy store, or had to plan a project for an assignment.

    I think that everyone is built with the capacity for both, and at times there is a need for both. You guys/girls at GoMedia do have the luxury of appointing one person to be structured and I’m sure that makes design a bit easier, since you only have to concentrate on what you are responsible for.

    I guess what I’m getting at is that not only are the symbiotic, but they actually intermingle… they’re woven together like cloth… without having one, the other crumbles.

  • http://www.rustyeight.com RustyEight

    Yay long winded response, here we go:

    I am a freelancer. Sure I have a 9-5 too keep a steady check in but that has nothing to do with my point.

    Being a freelancer forces you take up both a Chthonian and Apollonian viewpoint simultaneously. Even if you don’t freelance, we have all had those jobs where you had to be the embodiment structure… maybe you were an assistant manager for a toy store, or had to plan a project for an assignment.

    I think that everyone is built with the capacity for both, and at times there is a need for both. You guys/girls at GoMedia do have the luxury of appointing one person to be structured and I’m sure that makes design a bit easier, since you only have to concentrate on what you are responsible for.

    I guess what I’m getting at is that not only are the symbiotic, but they actually intermingle… they’re woven together like cloth… without having one, the other crumbles.

  • http://sumtingnu.blogspot.com/ Joshua Bullock

    Great topic/article and I have to agree Liz. I think that structure utterly ties the creativity to beauty. I can also totally respect the need for a more visceral display of “art” that’s completely free-form and open; we still find an abundance of structure throughout art, science, and nature.

    Course, I’m a web dev and have been neck-deep in setting my designs on baseline grids for CSS lately so I’m probably heavily biased here too. :P

  • http://sumtingnu.blogspot.com/ Joshua Bullock

    Great topic/article and I have to agree Liz. I think that structure utterly ties the creativity to beauty. I can also totally respect the need for a more visceral display of “art” that’s completely free-form and open; we still find an abundance of structure throughout art, science, and nature.

    Course, I’m a web dev and have been neck-deep in setting my designs on baseline grids for CSS lately so I’m probably heavily biased here too. :P

  • http://www.createatwill.com Willy

    Well there just aint enough articles like this! In this ever more interactive world of design it’s not enough to be either illogical (creative?) or logical (rational?) – you need a thorough understanding of both in my opinion

  • http://www.createatwill.com Willy

    Well there just aint enough articles like this! In this ever more interactive world of design it’s not enough to be either illogical (creative?) or logical (rational?) – you need a thorough understanding of both in my opinion

  • http://www.safetygoat.co.uk kat neville

    I hate this whole concept that you have to be one or the other. I work as a web designer, love to draw, but at school, I was also good at math and accounting. Sure, people have strengths and weaknesses, and sure, personality quizzes are oh so fun to take, but saying, “I’m a creative” and that’s the end of it, means you’re losing such a large part of a personality’s spectrum.

  • http://www.safetygoat.co.uk kat neville

    I hate this whole concept that you have to be one or the other. I work as a web designer, love to draw, but at school, I was also good at math and accounting. Sure, people have strengths and weaknesses, and sure, personality quizzes are oh so fun to take, but saying, “I’m a creative” and that’s the end of it, means you’re losing such a large part of a personality’s spectrum.

  • http://www.jagdesignideas.com Joel G

    Great post – just like to say one thing: Being a creative professional many times lends itself to isolationism. Especially if you’re a freelancer or a one person agency. Partly due to the fact, I suspect, that many creatively minded people also tend to have introverted personalities of some degree, by nature. However, anything of true consequence is seldom accomplished apart from community. This is a great lesson I’m learning in many areas of my life – especially from my Christian faith, but also very applicable to any other area of life.

    The project manager role is one that I can greatly appreciate, and being one of those freelancer’s, it’s also something that I sometimes really wish I had!! (or at least a secretary) I think that in an industry where things tend to become very ethereal and Type-B oriented, the P.M. is person who has to keep things practical and manage alot of the Type-A responsibilities. But it just proves that for really great things to happen, it takes more than just one – it usually takes community. (*yes I’m using a noun as a verb:)

  • http://www.jagdesignideas.com Joel G

    Great post – just like to say one thing: Being a creative professional many times lends itself to isolationism. Especially if you’re a freelancer or a one person agency. Partly due to the fact, I suspect, that many creatively minded people also tend to have introverted personalities of some degree, by nature. However, anything of true consequence is seldom accomplished apart from community. This is a great lesson I’m learning in many areas of my life – especially from my Christian faith, but also very applicable to any other area of life.

    The project manager role is one that I can greatly appreciate, and being one of those freelancer’s, it’s also something that I sometimes really wish I had!! (or at least a secretary) I think that in an industry where things tend to become very ethereal and Type-B oriented, the P.M. is person who has to keep things practical and manage alot of the Type-A responsibilities. But it just proves that for really great things to happen, it takes more than just one – it usually takes community. (*yes I’m using a noun as a verb:)

  • Tori

    LMAO @ the link for the “pile of poo”…

  • Tori

    LMAO @ the link for the “pile of poo”…

  • http://www.JonathanCutrell.com Jonathan Cutrell

    Wow,

    I wish I could say that’s all I have to say…

    But the truth is, this is something that I have been processing in my mind for about the last week or so.

    Creativity and structure are so incredibly infused with one another; it is a coexistence of definition and dependency.

    It is similar to C.S. Lewis’s argument for the existence of God; the intrinsic knowledge of evil (one man kills another, everyone agrees that’s not okay) is enough proof for the existence of God. In the same way, our knowledge of order is proof of disorder; however, artistic creativity is not disorder necessarily, and can be therefore married to order.

    In fact, order is a tool by which one creates; once again, a theological example (sorry… it’s just the classes I’m in…):
    In the story of Creation (whether you believe in it or not…), a creator takes something that is void of form and forms it.

    So, we have taken on this creator’s hat, and we take matter that is void of form and give it some kind of form. Whatever we call creativity, we as designers are interpreting something from the formless mass of what is yet to be interpreted; a kind of matter that is intangible. We tap into that matter and take pieces of it to put into our work as organized, however unconventionally it may be. A structure doesn’t necessarily mean stuffy or boxy; it doesn’t even mean organized in the sense of comprehension.

    It simply means put together; some kind of purpose behind our design, and if we disagree that our designs crave purpose and function, I’d say we have shifted from graphic designers to purely art, a more introverted form of interpretation.

    We create for ourselves, surely, but we create much more for others.

    Communication demands structure, and design demands communication. Art is a part of this, but it may just be how you decide to use structure as a filter for interpretation that classifies what we do as art.

  • http://www.JonathanCutrell.com Jonathan Cutrell

    Wow,

    I wish I could say that’s all I have to say…

    But the truth is, this is something that I have been processing in my mind for about the last week or so.

    Creativity and structure are so incredibly infused with one another; it is a coexistence of definition and dependency.

    It is similar to C.S. Lewis’s argument for the existence of God; the intrinsic knowledge of evil (one man kills another, everyone agrees that’s not okay) is enough proof for the existence of God. In the same way, our knowledge of order is proof of disorder; however, artistic creativity is not disorder necessarily, and can be therefore married to order.

    In fact, order is a tool by which one creates; once again, a theological example (sorry… it’s just the classes I’m in…):
    In the story of Creation (whether you believe in it or not…), a creator takes something that is void of form and forms it.

    So, we have taken on this creator’s hat, and we take matter that is void of form and give it some kind of form. Whatever we call creativity, we as designers are interpreting something from the formless mass of what is yet to be interpreted; a kind of matter that is intangible. We tap into that matter and take pieces of it to put into our work as organized, however unconventionally it may be. A structure doesn’t necessarily mean stuffy or boxy; it doesn’t even mean organized in the sense of comprehension.

    It simply means put together; some kind of purpose behind our design, and if we disagree that our designs crave purpose and function, I’d say we have shifted from graphic designers to purely art, a more introverted form of interpretation.

    We create for ourselves, surely, but we create much more for others.

    Communication demands structure, and design demands communication. Art is a part of this, but it may just be how you decide to use structure as a filter for interpretation that classifies what we do as art.

  • LizHunt

    I did it just to piss you off, Oliver :)

  • http://www.instantshift.com DKumar M.

    Hi liz, Nice article, I like the moral of the whole thing. I also a Freelancer and the role i have to play in every case is not well defined.

    There are some factors which one need to consider like creativity, out of the box thinking, knowledge etc…

    Anyway, nice Writing.

  • http://www.instantshift.com DKumar M.

    Hi liz, Nice article, I like the moral of the whole thing. I also a Freelancer and the role i have to play in every case is not well defined.

    There are some factors which one need to consider like creativity, out of the box thinking, knowledge etc…

    Anyway, nice Writing.

  • Simon H.

    Nice way to reflect about that opposition. And I ike your conclusion as well.
    But still : there are never such a division in a creative process to me. I think it would dry it out. Or kill it.

    Creativity needs to be wild and choatic, or at least to have some times when it can be ike that.
    Then the order and logic takes place to sort stuff, in order to communicate what we want to communicate (at least in graphic design/communication).

    At least I think.
    Would I be wrong ?

  • Simon H.

    Nice way to reflect about that opposition. And I ike your conclusion as well.
    But still : there are never such a division in a creative process to me. I think it would dry it out. Or kill it.

    Creativity needs to be wild and choatic, or at least to have some times when it can be ike that.
    Then the order and logic takes place to sort stuff, in order to communicate what we want to communicate (at least in graphic design/communication).

    At least I think.
    Would I be wrong ?

  • Kyle

    Without the structure, the creative can’t be focused. I see the ideal situation as the PM supporting the creative team – symbiotic for sure.

    Nice post.

  • Kyle

    Without the structure, the creative can’t be focused. I see the ideal situation as the PM supporting the creative team – symbiotic for sure.

    Nice post.

  • http://thefrosty.com TheFrosty

    Freelance for life, or hope to no work 9-5..

  • http://thefrosty.com TheFrosty

    Freelance for life, or hope to no work 9-5..

  • http://www.cotygonzales.com Coty

    Great read, Liz. Very philosophical. I enjoyed it very much. I think the best situation is being able to “create” without any forced structure, self-imposed or otherwise.

  • http://www.cotygonzales.com Coty

    Great read, Liz. Very philosophical. I enjoyed it very much. I think the best situation is being able to “create” without any forced structure, self-imposed or otherwise.

  • Simona

    It all works well when your project manager knows the job well…

    There is a need of structure, but the key is to have it in harmony. When things get out of balance, that’s when trouble arises.

    I believe in duality and its goal to be in balance, there is not one without the other.

    It’s all about the contrast, without it we wouldn’t have a need to be creative or structured, no need for expansion or growth.

    And I would love to have a great project manager by my side! :)

  • Simona

    It all works well when your project manager knows the job well…

    There is a need of structure, but the key is to have it in harmony. When things get out of balance, that’s when trouble arises.

    I believe in duality and its goal to be in balance, there is not one without the other.

    It’s all about the contrast, without it we wouldn’t have a need to be creative or structured, no need for expansion or growth.

    And I would love to have a great project manager by my side! :)

  • http://www.jagdesignideas.com Joel G

    @ Jonathan Cutrell…

    Well articulated. (I can see C.S. Lewis’ writting has been affecting your thinking!)

    ALSO…

    Contrast is one of the best parts of any artistic piece!!

  • http://www.jagdesignideas.com Joel G

    @ Jonathan Cutrell…

    Well articulated. (I can see C.S. Lewis’ writting has been affecting your thinking!)

    ALSO…

    Contrast is one of the best parts of any artistic piece!!

  • http://www.queensboro.com Kate Elzer-Peters

    I am so excited to see this post! I have a super example of creativity and structure going hand in hand: The Queensboro blog.

    Now, I’m not just posting here to get the word out on the blog, but because our blog for today (10/13/2008) so handily illustrates your point. We have a super team of logo artists that create some awesome original work for printing and embroidery. One of the artists came up with a great story line to teach our customers about the file size we need for digital printing. He teamed up with one of the other artists to draw the comic, and today we debuted it. I have been encouraging (well, beating them over the head) to create more comics and stories for the blog because I think that medium is going to appeal to a whole new audience. Plus, it is a great way to highlight their talent.

    The combined creativity and structure to develop a great product–the comic. They were able to weave in useful information, innuendo, and humor and make a previously very dry subject fun. I’m the one in marketing, but Eli had a great understanding of the entire Queensboro operation and was the one that worked on the dialog to make sure that it was funny, useful and made people want to try our digital printing.

    Check it out at: http://queensboro.wordpress.com/2008/10/13/logo-love/

  • http://www.queensboro.com Kate Elzer-Peters

    I am so excited to see this post! I have a super example of creativity and structure going hand in hand: The Queensboro blog.

    Now, I’m not just posting here to get the word out on the blog, but because our blog for today (10/13/2008) so handily illustrates your point. We have a super team of logo artists that create some awesome original work for printing and embroidery. One of the artists came up with a great story line to teach our customers about the file size we need for digital printing. He teamed up with one of the other artists to draw the comic, and today we debuted it. I have been encouraging (well, beating them over the head) to create more comics and stories for the blog because I think that medium is going to appeal to a whole new audience. Plus, it is a great way to highlight their talent.

    The combined creativity and structure to develop a great product–the comic. They were able to weave in useful information, innuendo, and humor and make a previously very dry subject fun. I’m the one in marketing, but Eli had a great understanding of the entire Queensboro operation and was the one that worked on the dialog to make sure that it was funny, useful and made people want to try our digital printing.

    Check it out at: http://queensboro.wordpress.com/2008/10/13/logo-love/

  • Bia SIlveira

    i could go on and on and on with quotes from ancient and modern philosophers, linguists and such, but all i will say er write is: hear hear/here here (which one is it anyway?) to all the above comments and the post obviously

  • Bia SIlveira

    i could go on and on and on with quotes from ancient and modern philosophers, linguists and such, but all i will say er write is: hear hear/here here (which one is it anyway?) to all the above comments and the post obviously

  • Dan

    Excellent job..
    dizi izle