Design insights & tutorials.

Become a Master Designer: Rule Four: Spacing Is Your Friend

Learn about proper spacing

Part Four of Seven Easy Principles to Becoming a Master Designer.

Sorry for the long delay in releasing this latest installment of Seven Easy Principles to Becoming a Master Designer. We have been slammed here at Go Media and I literally haven’t been able to touch anything except paying projects for the past two months. Enough complaining. On with the show!

This lesson is all about layout and spacing. One mistake I see young designers make frequently is that they cram everything too close together. They try to put too much content in too small of a space. Space is your friend! Space does many things for you. It makes your copy easier to read. Space makes your over-all composition easier on the eyes of the audience. And space also makes your design look elegant. You’re telling the audience: “we’re so rich we can afford to use this entire poster to communicate this one little message.”

So, there is a basic strategy for the layout (spacing) of your design. And that strategy is: HAVE ONE. What I mean is – have a plan. Have a system. This is the first thing. Unless your GOAL is to make the entire layout look random, you’re going to need a plan. This is usually accomplished with a grid. The grid can be any style you want. But you need to have an underlying system to what you’re about to do. Here are a few examples of different grids, just so you can get a sense of how different or unique your grid can be.

Sample design grids

Now, here is some of the same content laid out three different ways: two with a grid and one without. As you’ll see, each grid still leaves you with a lot of layout options. Having no grid can result in chaos.

normal grid layout
normal grid layout

These first images show a fairly traditional grid. The lines are perfectly vertical and horizontal. They are dispersed at regular intervals.

diagonal grid layout
diagonal grid layout

This second grid is similar to the first one with one simple change – I have slanted the vertical lines to match up with the angle of the sides of the container that holds the logo at the top. You can see how a minor change can result in some really cool results.

no grid layout

This last example has no grid. Spacing is random. Now, I obviously really messed this up to make a point. This particular piece does not have much content, so – even messed up it really doesn’t look THAT bad. But the more content you have, the more important it becomes to be working with a system of organization!

I know you’re asking yourself: “Does he REALLY make a grid before he lays out every single design?” Well, no, I don’t. But understanding the method behind proper layout WITH A GRID will eventually allow you to design WITHOUT A GRID (The grid will just be in your mind. You’ll visualize it on the page, but won’t spend the time to set one up.)

So, what does this grid teach us?

1. Well, the most obvious answer is: LINE THINGS UP! Seems obvious right? Well, once again – this is one of those basics that the novice will often times forget to do. Not every single item in the design lines up in one single file line, but things that should look like a group should be placed on the same grid line – they should line up. *If you have never studied the Gestalt Principles of grouping, now would be a GREAT time to do a quick Google search and familiarize yourself with these concepts. They are critical to how you layout your design.

2. In addition to lining things up you want to space things at regular intervals. If you have three bullet points under a heading, you want to make sure the interval of space between each bullet point is the same.

3. Having ample space around your copy makes the copy easier to read. Here is an example of two designs – one is spaced nicely away from the edge of the flyer and the photos, the second on is close to the edges of the flyer and close to a photo.

well spaced copy
poorly spaced copy

Does one feel cramped and hard to read? Answer = yes. Even though the second example has bigger text, it feels cramped and is harder to read.

You also want to avoid what is known as the “kiss.” No, this does not involve lips. A “kiss” is when two objects just barely touch. If, for instance, you have copy and a photo and they just barely touch. This is bad. Either give them a sufficient gap OR, make them overlap in a very obvious way.

a kiss is bad
Here is a close up of the fight flier – here the web address just barely touches the horizontal background orange line.

having space is good
Here is the same design with the web address pulled back away from that line. This is much better.

overlapping is ok too
Or, if you need the room – they can overlap. But I am going to make sure they are overlapping by a significant amount. Also – just to insure that there is enough contrast between the web address and the background I have added a drop shadow. This way the web address really pops off the page.

And a quick aside – if anyone out there needs a great workout, nutrition plan or a fitness assessment please visit www.hyperstrike.com (Yes, they are one of our clients. And they truly have a GREAT service.)

Now – I know one problem many of you designers are having (because I’ve had this very problem myself): a client that wants you to cram 50 pages of content onto a single 8.5×11 inch flier. When you do your very best to layout all of this information in an organized way your client says: “Oh! There’s enough room to put some more info on it! Here is another 10 pages of content to cram on there!”
What do you do? What do you do when a client keeps giving you too much content for too small of a space? Well, this is a problem. And there is not necessarily an easy answer. My first piece of advice would be to try your very best to EDUCATE your customer about good design principles. Try to make them aware that their audience won’t even want to LOOK at an ad with this much content crammed into such a small space, let alone spend the time to try and read it. If the client won’t listen to reason you may be stuck producing a horrible design. I’ve had to do this. It sucks. If you have the time, you could also layout one version that is clean and ask him to take a survey of their friends and get more opinions. Unfortunately we frequently don’t have that much time available to us. So, we do our best hang our heads low as we send the design to the printer.

One last little thing to be aware of is optical illusions. Huh? How do optical illusions have anything to do with spacing? As crazy as this sounds – you need to be aware of optical illusions when you space your objects! Sometime, due to optical illusions – your proper spacing will LOOK like its off-center. A curving pattern in the background for instance can make an object look like it’s leaning, or is simply off-center.

So, how do we compensate for these optical illusions? Well – you use your eye; the same tool that is telling you it looks wrong, will be the tool you’ll use to correct for the optical illusion.

Making a correction for optical illusions is known as “best appearance.” It’s not necessarily correct, but it’s what LOOKS correct.

So, always take one last look at your composition and make sure everything looks right.

I guess those are my pearls of wisdom concerning spacing. Three more articles to go for this series! Thank you for your support.

About the Author, William Beachy

I grew up in Cleveland Hts. Ohio and was drawing constantly. As a child I took art classes at the Cleveland Institute of Art and eventually became known as the "class artist." I graduated from The Ohio State University's department of Industrial Design. I have always tried to blend my passion for illustration with Graphic Design. Go Media was the culmination of my interests for both business and art. I'm trying to build a company that is equally considerate of our designers AND our clients.
Discover More by William Beachy

Discussion

We want to hear what you have to say. Do you agree? Do you have a better way to approach the topic? Let the community know by joining the discussion.

  • Brett Nimphius

    Nice job on this one man, good insight. You guys know your shit

  • Brett Nimphius

    Nice job on this one man, good insight. You guys know your shit

  • Firewalker

    Spacing greatly improves readability and aesthetics of your design. Most designers would think a lot before putting every words inside their layout. Whether it is font size, line height, or space between letters. All of it matters in great advertisement.

    Putting grids as guidelines for making spaces is a good method, IMHO it will cost more time with nice result. But if you already used to it, you won’t be need it as much as before.

  • http://www.younoob.net Noe

    Great article! Heres a quick tip for you photoshop users. Instead spending your precious time on creating a grid, use photoshop’s build in grid by going to the top View Menu > Show > Grid. You can easily toggle it on and off by using the cmd + ‘. Hope that helps any!

  • http://www.younoob.net Noe

    Great article! Heres a quick tip for you photoshop users. Instead spending your precious time on creating a grid, use photoshop’s build in grid by going to the top View Menu > Show > Grid. You can easily toggle it on and off by using the cmd + ‘. Hope that helps any!

  • Adam

    Thanks Bill – this is really nicely done. I’ll be sure to read this every time I think it’s a great idea to place text right up against the edge of a design element… which is unfortunately most of the time :)

    Actually, I have recently reduced that bad design habit of mine. Picked up the book “Grid Systems in Graphic Design” and soaked it up.

  • Adam

    Thanks Bill – this is really nicely done. I’ll be sure to read this every time I think it’s a great idea to place text right up against the edge of a design element… which is unfortunately most of the time :)

    Actually, I have recently reduced that bad design habit of mine. Picked up the book “Grid Systems in Graphic Design” and soaked it up.

  • Blake

    Good advice, thanks.

  • Blake

    Good advice, thanks.

  • Firewalker

    Spacing greatly improves readability and aesthetics of your design. Most designers would think a lot before putting every words inside their layout. Whether it is font size, line height, or space between letters. All of it matters in great advertisement.

    Putting grids as guidelines for making spaces is a good method, IMHO it will cost more time with nice result. But if you already used to it, you won’t be need it as much as before.

  • http://cloud9design.wordpress.com Cloud9 Design

    Ah, Gestalt principles. Brings me back to college days…lovely design classes! :0)

  • http://cloud9design.wordpress.com Cloud9 Design

    Ah, Gestalt principles. Brings me back to college days…lovely design classes! :0)

  • http://www.digitalskraps.com David Sparks

    I’ve just recently started using grids a lot and I’m definitely enjoying them however there is one thing I don’t like and thats setting them up.

    Is there a cool grid generator online that’s free to use? or a cool plug in for photoshop/illustrator? anything of that nature would rule.

    and for any web designers out there like myself. enjoy:

    http://www.sprymedia.co.uk/article/Grid

  • http://www.digitalskraps.com David Sparks

    I’ve just recently started using grids a lot and I’m definitely enjoying them however there is one thing I don’t like and thats setting them up.

    Is there a cool grid generator online that’s free to use? or a cool plug in for photoshop/illustrator? anything of that nature would rule.

    and for any web designers out there like myself. enjoy:

    http://www.sprymedia.co.uk/article/Grid

  • Brian M

    Very good topic. A lot of designers do not realize the importance of spacing in a layout. Your segment was very informative and to the point. I love the section on non-designers wanting to cram info on a small space. I get that all to often. But what can you do when they are paying you for what they want.

    Great Post!

  • Brian M

    Very good topic. A lot of designers do not realize the importance of spacing in a layout. Your segment was very informative and to the point. I love the section on non-designers wanting to cram info on a small space. I get that all to often. But what can you do when they are paying you for what they want.

    Great Post!

  • http://www.avangelistdesign.com The Avangelist

    That was fookin brilliant! I really enjoyed reading that, grid structures is something I have always struggled with, not strictly deciding what layout to have but the line heights for the horizontal spacing.

    I had completely forgotten the others articles in this series, I must go back over and have a refresher.

    Started Open University last night on web design and development, first two chapters of my text book has been drumming home negative and positive white space and this has just added a valuable new dynamic to that theorum.

    Andy P

  • http://www.avangelistdesign.com The Avangelist

    That was fookin brilliant! I really enjoyed reading that, grid structures is something I have always struggled with, not strictly deciding what layout to have but the line heights for the horizontal spacing.

    I had completely forgotten the others articles in this series, I must go back over and have a refresher.

    Started Open University last night on web design and development, first two chapters of my text book has been drumming home negative and positive white space and this has just added a valuable new dynamic to that theorum.

    Andy P

  • http://www.richnosworthy.com rich n

    These tutorials are ace. Have learned loads from em. Keep em coming and thanks a lot!

  • http://www.richnosworthy.com rich n

    These tutorials are ace. Have learned loads from em. Keep em coming and thanks a lot!

  • http://mrenteria.com mike

    i have recently had run in with a client that doesnt understand the concept of space. after submitting a clean layout with what i thought was a nice balance of space and text, the client says “uh, whats all this space here, we need to make the text bigger”

  • http://mrenteria.com mike

    i have recently had run in with a client that doesnt understand the concept of space. after submitting a clean layout with what i thought was a nice balance of space and text, the client says “uh, whats all this space here, we need to make the text bigger”

  • http://www.avangelistdesign.com The Avangelist

    @David Sparks

    That Grid tool is a peice of pure genius isn’t it! Everyone should check that one out.

    http://www.sprymedia.co.uk/article/Grid

  • http://www.avangelistdesign.com The Avangelist

    @David Sparks

    That Grid tool is a peice of pure genius isn’t it! Everyone should check that one out.

    http://www.sprymedia.co.uk/article/Grid

  • Joe

    Awesome write up. It’s amazing how many designers (in particular newer designers that never learned the old school layout process)

    I never thought of using “different” grids like the diagonal or radial. Is there an EASY way to get grids like that into Photoshop or would Illustrator be the best way?

  • Joe

    Awesome write up. It’s amazing how many designers (in particular newer designers that never learned the old school layout process)

    I never thought of using “different” grids like the diagonal or radial. Is there an EASY way to get grids like that into Photoshop or would Illustrator be the best way?

  • http://www.digitalskraps.com David Sparks

    yeah i love that tool! My site design process is now making a blank html file in dreamweaver previewing that and then setting up my grid on an all white page with that tool, taking a screen shot and then taking that into photoshop to start my design. sometimes i put the guides on top so i dont have to have it stacked all the time and use that nifty snap to function.

    but yeah. its a godsend.

  • http://www.digitalskraps.com David Sparks

    yeah i love that tool! My site design process is now making a blank html file in dreamweaver previewing that and then setting up my grid on an all white page with that tool, taking a screen shot and then taking that into photoshop to start my design. sometimes i put the guides on top so i dont have to have it stacked all the time and use that nifty snap to function.

    but yeah. its a godsend.

  • http://www.Jarmoo.com Andre

    That technique “best appearance” is so true. I try to align thing properly many time and it just doesn’t look right.

  • http://www.Jarmoo.com Andre

    That technique “best appearance” is so true. I try to align thing properly many time and it just doesn’t look right.

  • http://www.sosnewbie.com Sergio Ordoñez

    Nice post, very useful. More I read about white space more important it become to me.

    Cheers.
    Sergio

    PS: you need some left marging in your posts :P

  • http://www.sosnewbie.com Sergio Ordoñez

    Nice post, very useful. More I read about white space more important it become to me.

    Cheers.
    Sergio

    PS: you need some left marging in your posts :P

  • http://www.digitalskratch.com Josh

    Great post! I totally agree, I love to space things out and use a grid for most layout. I really liked the examples and the version where you angled the work-out flyer, it looked really cool.

    I often wondered about optical illusions and what was the “correct” way to handle them. I always did the same thing, where I kind of eyeballed it out to make it “look” correct but wasn’t sure if that was best practice. So that’s good to know thats what you guys do too.

    Thanks again!

    Josh

  • http://www.digitalskratch.com Josh

    Great post! I totally agree, I love to space things out and use a grid for most layout. I really liked the examples and the version where you angled the work-out flyer, it looked really cool.

    I often wondered about optical illusions and what was the “correct” way to handle them. I always did the same thing, where I kind of eyeballed it out to make it “look” correct but wasn’t sure if that was best practice. So that’s good to know thats what you guys do too.

    Thanks again!

    Josh

  • http://www.gomedia.us Bill

    I do not have good insights for setting up grids in Photoshop. In truth I do 99% of my layout in Illustrator, unless it’s a multipage document over 4 pages – then I’ll use In Design.

    I only use Photoshop for it’s originally intended purpose: editing photos (or any other pixel-based art.) I know they’ve added lots of layout tools over the years, but in my opinion it’s still not up to par with Illustrator for layout purposes.

    Thanks for everyone’s feedback! WE DO CARE!

    -Bill

  • http://www.gomedia.us Bill

    I do not have good insights for setting up grids in Photoshop. In truth I do 99% of my layout in Illustrator, unless it’s a multipage document over 4 pages – then I’ll use In Design.

    I only use Photoshop for it’s originally intended purpose: editing photos (or any other pixel-based art.) I know they’ve added lots of layout tools over the years, but in my opinion it’s still not up to par with Illustrator for layout purposes.

    Thanks for everyone’s feedback! WE DO CARE!

    -Bill

  • http://www.gomedia.us Bill

    Illustrator does have a quick grid tool – actually two. If you click and hold down on the line tool a fly-out menu will show you other tools. One is a rectangular grid tool, the other one is a radial grid tool.

    When using these, I suggest just clicking once on your work area. That will bring up their menus. You can dial in exactly how many verticals, how many horizontals and it has some spacing controls. It’s abilities are somewhat limited, but this is a good start.

  • http://www.gomedia.us Bill

    Illustrator does have a quick grid tool – actually two. If you click and hold down on the line tool a fly-out menu will show you other tools. One is a rectangular grid tool, the other one is a radial grid tool.

    When using these, I suggest just clicking once on your work area. That will bring up their menus. You can dial in exactly how many verticals, how many horizontals and it has some spacing controls. It’s abilities are somewhat limited, but this is a good start.

  • http://www.rshawn.com Shawn

    Great article! So do you manually setup grids that aren’t in the traditional grid layout? If so how?

  • http://www.rshawn.com Shawn

    Great article! So do you manually setup grids that aren’t in the traditional grid layout? If so how?

  • Jape

    Thanks again for another informative tutorial. I always learn something new….

  • Jape

    Thanks again for another informative tutorial. I always learn something new….

  • andres

    It sure took you a while but it was worth it

  • andres

    It sure took you a while but it was worth it

  • jonny lozano

    truly insightful, as a young designer i can truly appreciate this. i have come along ways from when i once stared and you have no idea how many young designers out there design with no grid system or even guides..

    super article!

  • jonny lozano

    truly insightful, as a young designer i can truly appreciate this. i have come along ways from when i once stared and you have no idea how many young designers out there design with no grid system or even guides..

    super article!

  • http://blog.sina.com.cn/bybobear Stephen

    Hi, bill. When is the rule 5? I have translate your previous 4 articles to Chinese for internal training. I am waiting for the rest. They are great articles. I love them.

  • http://blog.sina.com.cn/bybobear Stephen

    Hi, bill. When is the rule 5? I have translate your previous 4 articles to Chinese for internal training. I am waiting for the rest. They are great articles. I love them.

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  • http://www.rob-barrett.com Rob Barrett

    Nice article! I never went to university, so I missed out on a lot of the formal teaching that most designers get, so little tidbits such as the mention of Gestalt Principles are always welcome!

    I don’t know if you’ve spotted this, but in this article and the previous Rule, your CMS is throwing up some weird characters in place of some of your punctuation, probably from pasting text from Word or something similar.

  • http://www.rob-barrett.com Rob Barrett

    Nice article! I never went to university, so I missed out on a lot of the formal teaching that most designers get, so little tidbits such as the mention of Gestalt Principles are always welcome!

    I don’t know if you’ve spotted this, but in this article and the previous Rule, your CMS is throwing up some weird characters in place of some of your punctuation, probably from pasting text from Word or something similar.

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  • http://einnova.com jordir

    I really like this series. And I’m waiting for months which will be “the rule five”.

  • http://einnova.com jordir

    I really like this series. And I’m waiting for months which will be “the rule five”.

  • http://www.gomedia.us Bill

    Hey Jordir,

    Sorry! I know, it’s been a looong while since my last post on this series. I keep getting swamped with client projects!

    Just so you know, the last 3 installments in this series will be:

    5. Depth
    6. Movement
    7. Composition

    I actually think there are the most fun aspects of design. The first four were like the basics… they insure your designs are clean and legible… these last three are the ones that make it COOL!

    I’ll have at least two of these done before the end of the month! I PROMISE.

    -Bill

  • http://www.gomedia.us Bill

    Hey Jordir,

    Sorry! I know, it’s been a looong while since my last post on this series. I keep getting swamped with client projects!

    Just so you know, the last 3 installments in this series will be:

    5. Depth
    6. Movement
    7. Composition

    I actually think there are the most fun aspects of design. The first four were like the basics… they insure your designs are clean and legible… these last three are the ones that make it COOL!

    I’ll have at least two of these done before the end of the month! I PROMISE.

    -Bill

  • http://einnova.com jordir

    It’s good to know which one’s will be the next one’s.

    Thanks a lot, I will waiting ’till then.
    :)

  • http://einnova.com jordir

    It’s good to know which one’s will be the next one’s.

    Thanks a lot, I will waiting ’till then.
    :)

  • http://www.pervasivepersuasion.com PervasivePersuasion.com

    Your seven rules series is serving up some excellent web design advice!

    Bruce Arnold, Website Designer
    Miami Florida

  • http://www.pervasivepersuasion.com PervasivePersuasion.com

    Your seven rules series is serving up some excellent web design advice!

    Bruce Arnold, Website Designer
    Miami Florida

  • AndrU

    My boss has to read this post!,

    Cheerz!, amazing as allways!.

  • AndrU

    My boss has to read this post!,

    Cheerz!, amazing as allways!.

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  • anubis2night@comcast.net

    Hey Bill thanks for the great tips. It’s been a while since I’ve reviewed em but they are as always great insights. All too often we or the clients can get caught up and want to use more. It’s often times the real masters that show us that less is more. If your clients are giving you grief you should show them this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aeXAcwriid0

    It’s called Microsoft Ipod. It was developed as a in house joke by the MS design team, and it shows what happens with too much information on a clean design. There’s a reason Apple’s products are so appealing. Also I’m really amazed at how many of the design principles your showing can be seen in so many other artforms. Sign painting and letter setting/ typography work with the same principle of less is more. And composition and depth principles can be found in filmmaking and photography as well. Makes me think I should go back and review as many classes as I can to become a better designer, anyways thanks again for the refresher. It’s great to see so many tips and tutorials at one site.

  • anubis2night@comcast.net

    Hey Bill thanks for the great tips. It’s been a while since I’ve reviewed em but they are as always great insights. All too often we or the clients can get caught up and want to use more. It’s often times the real masters that show us that less is more. If your clients are giving you grief you should show them this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aeXAcwriid0

    It’s called Microsoft Ipod. It was developed as a in house joke by the MS design team, and it shows what happens with too much information on a clean design. There’s a reason Apple’s products are so appealing. Also I’m really amazed at how many of the design principles your showing can be seen in so many other artforms. Sign painting and letter setting/ typography work with the same principle of less is more. And composition and depth principles can be found in filmmaking and photography as well. Makes me think I should go back and review as many classes as I can to become a better designer, anyways thanks again for the refresher. It’s great to see so many tips and tutorials at one site.

  • http://lrgstudios.com John Dangerous

    I just started a new freelance gig and everyone I work with loves to work with a damn grid. If someone walks past me and doesn’t see the grid they are going to stop and ask me why I’m not using it. So I guess what I am saying is the grid does help and you should use it. It will make you a stronger designer. I just feel a little crazy when I see it because it reminds me of this gig and those people are crazy about that grid lol. Just thought I would add my 2 cents. Now back to work!

  • http://lrgstudios.com John Dangerous

    I just started a new freelance gig and everyone I work with loves to work with a damn grid. If someone walks past me and doesn’t see the grid they are going to stop and ask me why I’m not using it. So I guess what I am saying is the grid does help and you should use it. It will make you a stronger designer. I just feel a little crazy when I see it because it reminds me of this gig and those people are crazy about that grid lol. Just thought I would add my 2 cents. Now back to work!

  • http://forthelose.org Wordpress Themes

    This is something that all newbies (including myself) have to learn the hard way. Spacing makes every design look that much better.

  • http://forthelose.org Wordpress Themes

    This is something that all newbies (including myself) have to learn the hard way. Spacing makes every design look that much better.

  • http://vampirefreaks.com/lucy_westen ana r p mendes

    I deeply hate when I'm working with people who don't seem to realise things like this for them selfs herh. Anyway, is good to make sure we have all the bases (who are stuff we'll always need to stick to) – I've been reading bcz I'm.. what I like to call “junior freelancer” hehe.
    The ones of the colors and fonts are the ones who have helped me most. I kinda have an issue on picking colors (and that website sure is helpful thank you so much! – I still don't know why I didnt whent to google before, to find already made color paletes to get inspired, duuumb!). >_<

    Anyway, this is super helpful (and so are the other tutorials or just tips). I'm enjoying this website quite allot hihi.

  • JC

    Yip… clients who want 36 products on one side of an a3 flyer. Don't I know that one…

  • leandro

    Wow! This is just about everything I should learn at college but they refuse to teach!!! Thank you very much! You now have a fan from Brazil!

  • leandro

    Wow! This is just about everything I should learn at college but they refuse to teach!!! Thank you very much! You now have a fan from Brazil!

  • Sam

    I really love this “guide”! BUT, in rule four all the pictures/examples are gone :(

    I would be very happy to see this!

  • MiMA_A

    I would also be really grateful if somebody could fix it, these tutorials are good!!

  • MiMA_A

    I would also be really grateful if somebody could fix it, these tutorials are good!!

  • Reigaz

    Thanks Bill, one of a good article, it helps a lot, reminding myself the principles of design, that sometimes I forgot to use it.. :D

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  • Dan

    Excellent job..
    dizi izle

  • http://www.bestcardprinter.com Jeff Jones

    Awesome write up. Great tips for the layout process, and love the idea that the grid doesn’t have to be all square and can be at a slight angle, the example really stood out for me, cheers for the inspiration

  • http://www.filmizlerik.com filmizle

    Fantastic! I need something like that on my website.

  • Jose Melgar

    I am a graphic designer based in Guatemala. I had to laugh when I read about clients asking to put a 50-page document into an 8.5″ x 5.5″ flyer. It is so true. But my client is a German-American, who won’t under any circumstance let himself be educated (“how a graphic designer is going to “educate” me, a Yale and Harvard graduate?”-he thinks). So inevitably we have fallen into cramming things up, because he pays, although I have repeatedly told him it is not functional.

  • Jose Melgar

    I am a graphic designer based in Guatemala. I had to laugh when I read about clients asking to put a 50-page document into an 8.5″ x 5.5″ flyer. It is so true. But my client is a German-American, who won’t under any circumstance let himself be educated (“how a graphic designer is going to “educate” me, a Yale and Harvard graduate?”-he thinks). So inevitably we have fallen into cramming things up, because he pays, although I have repeatedly told him it is not functional.

  • James Ledger

    Very helpful this. Thanks for sharing.

  • Wazup sam

    Wisdom dude! Thank you so much!